Cap-Haïtien: Arrival & Adventures

Note: Wi-Fi in Northern Haiti has been spotty due to frequent storms and power outages. We are thrilled to belatedly share our adventures!

Our day began Monday morning in Atlanta. We caught an early flight to Miami. After a short layover and some Cuban sandwiches, we continued to our final destination: Cap-Haïtien, located on the Northern Coast of Haiti.

We deplaned on the tarmac and jostled our way into the crowded immigration line. Looking for our baggage… we found that it was directly in front of us in the single roomed international airport.

Breezing through the Customs Officers’ inspections, we went outside to meet our fearless leader Dr. Bussenius. We were whisked away in the tap-tap, the double-wide, open bed truck that would remain our sole source of transportation. Wilnick, our constant companion and Haitian guide, rode with us through the bustling city and up the steep hill to arrive at the lovely Mont Joli Hotel.

We made our way down the flowered path to our rooms. After dinner, we settled in for the night excited to begin our immersion clinical experience.

On our first clinic day, we awoke bright and early, excited to get to work.  We piled into the truck and started off through town.  We were surprised to find that Cap Haitien has a rush hour to rival Atlanta’s!

After we got past the traffic, we stopped at the women’s hospital and dropped off two of our students to work for the day.  The rest continued, past the sugarcane fields, down a long county road line with grazing cattle and goats.  Nearing the end of the drive, we were greeted by many people, young and old, walking down the dirt road towards the Eternal Hope Orphanage.  We stopped briefly at the metal gate, which was let open by a guard.  The truck drove through and the gate quickly closed again.

We hopped off the truck and began setting up the clinic in the shady courtyard of the orphanage.  Several members of the team went outside of the gates and began triaging pediatric and adult patients.

Our busy outdoor clinic buzzed with activity as adult and pediatric patients were seen and treated at several different stations. A child was found to be so ill that he needed to be taken to a nearby hospital; two students accompanied him along with our trusted driver, Luken.

With supplies running low, we finished up clinic in the early evening.  We saw 300 patients, more than had ever been seen on a single day.  We headed back to the hotel, tired but happy at the end of a full day.

-Michele Carranza, ENP Candidate

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