Archive for BSN Junior

Congratulations Women’s Health Class of 2016 Graduates

Congratulations Emory University School of Nursing Class of 2016 graduates

(from left) Women’s Health Class of 2016 graduates Tiffanye Williams, Jasmine McCorkle, and Jenna Dannenbaum

The School of Nursing’s Women’s Health program celebrated Class of 2016 graduates, current, and future students in a magical winter wonderland complete with plenty of sparkle, candle light, and snow.

Participants enjoyed the sites, sounds, and treats of the season, while competing in a tacky holiday sweater competition, posing in the holiday photo booth, and leaving messages and well-wishes for graduates and current students. The event was organized by Program Coordinator Trisha Sheridan.

On the evening before the Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing’s Winter Awards Ceremony, graduates look forward to the future.

Jasmine McCorkle

Why I chose Women’s Health:
I chose women’s Health because I have a passion for helping women. I was originally a labor and deliver nurse, but I would only see my patients for a brief period of time. With primary care I will be able to see them long-term and, hopefully, make a lasting impact on their lives.

Tiffanye Williams
Why I chose Women’s Health:
I was a nurse for about 7.5 years and a travel nurse for about 4.5 years. I had some case management experience for about a year and a half. Throughout my career I discovered that I had a strong passion for helping women and wanted to specialize in Women’s Health.
Plans after Graduation: Besides working…in the near future I would like to open my own clinic for women’s health.

Jenna Dannenbaum
Why I chose Women’s Health
: I was a labor and deliver nurse prior to this in the Atlanta area. I am interested in increasing access to contraception for women and helping women be more educated about their bodies and make more informed decisions about their health throughout their lifespans.
Plans after graduation: After graduation, I am hoping to work in a private practice setting under a good team of doctors whom I can collaborate with and show them what nurse practitioners have to offer.

Learn more about the Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner specialty from current students.


5 Tips to Successfully Apply to Top Nursing Schools

emorynursingapplicationtipsWith careers in nursing booming, getting into a top-notch nursing program has become a competitive endeavor. According to a report by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, U.S. nursing schools turned away 68,938 qualified applicants away because of the high demand for nursing education.

Nursing is a rewarding and challenging field with dozens of specialties. Talented nurses hailing from the nation’s most prestigious nursing schools are able to find work in their field at hospitals and in doctors’ offices all over the country.

If you’re interested in choosing nursing for your career, your next step is to put together a strong application to impress the programs you’re interested in. Feeling nervous about getting it all done? Try these tips to get organized and successfully apply to top nursing schools.

1. Do Your Research

Before you apply, study up on what each program offers to make sure your preferred specialties, learning styles and locations are covered. You’ll also want to visit the campus to get a sense of what life there is like.

2. Apply to More Than One School

Rank your favorites, and apply to your personal top three to five programs. If you get accepted to more than one, you’ll be able to compare and contrast the programs and any financial aid packages to make an informed decision.

3. Apply Early

This is especially important if you’re looking at a program with a rolling admissions process — you don’t want all the spaces to be filled before you send in your application! Applying early gives the admissions committee time to consider your application and may give you a leg up on getting scholarship money. Scholarship awards are awarded generously to applicants who apply before the priority scholarship deadline.

4. Be Yourself

Admissions committees look to create diverse student bodies, so be sure to list all your previous jobs, extracurricular activities, volunteer work and any other unique leadership roles you’ve taken on. Let your personality shine through in your application. You can bring your application to life by giving the admission committee the chance to get to know you. Most schools offer Open Houses, Virtual Webinars, Facebook Chats, and Shadow Days. These are all excellent ways for you to get to know the school and for the school to get to know you.

5. Proofread

While showing off your unique style is a good thing, irregular spelling and grammar are not. Be sure to carefully edit and proofread your full application to avoid careless mistakes. These may be innocent, but they show a lack of attention to detail that points to a lack of effort — and a quick rejection.

Next Steps

As you research top nursing programs, be sure to check out Emory University’s Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing. Emory makes it easy to schedule a visit and learn more about its programs through information sessions. When you’re ready, try Emory’s new online application to the nursing program. It’s quick, it’s easy, and it takes less than 30 minutes to get started on your future today.

What NOT to Wear, Emory Edition

When I started nursing school last fall at Emory, one of the more confusing topics (aside from Pathophysiology) was the dress code for clinical and lab settings. I had heard from other students that it was allowable to wear certain articles of clothing or shoes, while the student handbook stated differently.

First thing’s first: When in doubt, GO BY THE STUDENT HANDBOOK! If you are ever questioning whether or not you are appropriately attired for clinical or lab refer to the written guidelines.

Below is your basic uniform for clinical and lab. Honestly, this is all you need (plus white socks!). The simpler, the better.

IMG_6635Here are some tips on what NOT to wear in the lab or clinical setting:

1. Nail Polish/Fake Nails. Trust me on this one, y’all. You will want to be able to see what is under those finger nails after a 12 hour shift of wound care. Also, fake nails are known to slice through gloves and get lost in patients’ bed sheets (yuck!)

2. Your Hair Down. Tie that hair back! The last thing you want is your hair dragging through a patient’s wound or blocking your eyesight while trying to insert an IV. It’s a good idea to always carry extra hair ties and clips.

3. Tattoos. Emory requires that you cover up any visible tattoos while you are in the lab and at your clinical sites. I’ve seen some pretty creative ways to cover up a tattoo, but I’ve heard that bandaids usually work the best. However, some people use makeup as well depending on the size and placement of the tattoo. It would be best to do some trial and error to discover what works before your first day of lab.

4. Long Sleeve Shirts Under Your Scrub Top. Coming from someone who is permanently cold, this can be very difficult. However, it is against the guidelines to wear a long-sleeve shirt under your scrub top for sanitary purposes. Instead, you can purchase a navy blue or white cuffed long-sleeved jacket to keep you warm in lab or at your clinical sites. Uniform Advantage has cuffed, long-sleeved jackets available and you can get our logo embroidered on it through them.

Screen Shot 2016-08-18 at 9.08.02 PM

5. Jewelry that Dangles….Or Jewelry in General. For the most part, wearing jewelry at lab or in clinical is not a good idea. Anything that dangles from your wrist, your neck, or your ears is bound to get caught on something or worse, caught IN something (*shudders*). Rings can also cause a problem as they can easily slice through gloves. A good rule of thumb is just to leave your jewelry at home where it is safe and out of the way. One small stud per ear is okay, and wedding bands are permissible. Do not, I repeat, do not wear your engagement ring to lab or clinical! I heard a horrible story about a nursing student who lost the stone from her engagement ring while changing a patient’s bed and it was never found.

6. Your Workout Sneakers. While at your clinical sites you are going to step in some gross stuff and even more gross stuff is going to spill on your shoes (I speak from unfortunate experience). You want to wear shoes that are durable and can easily be washed. Get some comfortable, solid white or black leather or vinyl shoes and leave your sneakers at home. Once again, Uniform Advantage has a great shoe selection, but there are other shopping options (such as Amazon) that you can explore.

7. Jeans. I know, I know, this one seems obvious, but it needs to be said. There will be times when you will need to wear your long, white lab coat and under that lab coat can be a) your Emory scrubs or b) business casual attire. NO JEANS! See below for some appropriate examples.

FullSizeRender 2 FullSizeRender 4 FullSizeRender 5 IMG_6639

8. Open-Toed Shoes. One of the most painful experiences that I have had is a gurney rolling over my toes, and I was wearing close-toed shoes. Imagine if they had been open….needless to say, all shoes must be close-toed in the lab and in the clinical setting.

9. Forgetting Your ID Badge. You need to have your ID badge with you AT ALL TIMES in the lab and at the clinical sites. That badge is your lifeline and it helps to identify you as an Emory student. It helps you get in and out of parking garages, medication rooms, and hospital units, just to name a few. It is costly to replace and difficult to go a day without, so be diligent about keeping it within reach.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Day 10 (6/24) – Las chicas de Moultrie

Day 10 – Las Chicas de Moultrie

For the final blog post, I thought I’d switch it up a little bit. I took part in this program alongside 14 amazing nursing students. Before this trip, most of us did not know much about each other, or the program, for that matter. But we are leaving Moultrie as sisters and more culturally competent nurses. For this blog post, I asked each of these wonderful girls how they felt about the Farm Worker Family Health Program. These were there answers:

"It's great to see how much good we are doing now. I would love to see how this program continues to grow in the coming years." Taryn Connelly, BSN Candidate '17

“It’s great to see how much good we are doing now. I would love to see how this program continues to grow in the coming years.” Taryn Connelly, BSN Candidate ’17

"Thank you Moultrie, and all the staff members, for providing us with an invaluable experience ." Ashley Rim, BSN Candidate '17

“Thank you Moultrie, and all the staff members, for providing us with an invaluable experience.” Ashley Rim, BSN Candidate ’17

"It's incredible to see how choosing to make a small difference can make a huge difference in someone else's life." Jennifer Zhang, BSN Candidate '17

“It’s incredible to see how choosing to make a small difference can make a huge difference in someone else’s life.” Jennifer Zhang, BSN Candidate ’17

 

 

"This was a better experience than I expected. The farm workers are very humble and appreciative. I wish we were here for a longer time." Alejandra Mendez, BSN Candidate '17

“This was a better experience than I expected. The farm workers are very humble and appreciative. I wish we were here for a longer time.” Alejandra Mendez, BSN Candidate ’17

"I had an amazing experience in Moultrie. The need is great in the farmworker population, but I am glad I was able to serve them through this program by putting a little seed forward. I am eager to take all the experiences and knowledge I gained through this trip to help vulnerable populations in the future." Karime Parra, BSN Candidate '17

“I had an amazing experience in Moultrie. The need is great in the farmworker population, but I am glad I was able to serve them through this program by putting a little seed forward. I am eager to take all the experiences and knowledge I gained through this trip to help vulnerable populations in the future.” Karime Parra, BSN Candidate ’17

"The best moments down in Moultrie happened when we were able to break down language barriers and share genuine laughter with the hardworking men we were caring for. It's that basic human connection that causes us to invest on a deeper level and to spark change for the future." Halle Sovich (left), BSN Candidate '18

“The best moments down in Moultrie happened when we were able to break down language barriers and share genuine laughter with the hardworking men we were caring for. It’s that basic human connection that causes us to invest on a deeper level and to spark change for the future.” Halle Sovich, BSN Candidate ’18

"This was really a great experience. I'm gonna go home and learn some Spanish!" Olivia Atlas, BSN Candidate '17

“This was really a great experience. I’m gonna go home and learn some Spanish!” Olivia Atlas, BSN Candidate ’17

"The children and farm workers we treated in Moultrie taught me one of the best lessons a nurse could ever learn. Sometimes the best medicine isn't medicine at all, but just some love and attention to let them know that someone cares." Jamie Smith, BSN Candidate '18

“The children and farm workers we treated in Moultrie taught me one of the best lessons a nurse could ever learn. Sometimes the best medicine isn’t medicine at all, but just some love and attention to let them know that someone cares.” Jamie Smith, BSN Candidate ’18

"I really learned a lot about myself during this trip. I am really thankful for this experience." Lucy Barr, BSN Candidate '18

“I really learned a lot about myself during this trip. I am really thankful for this experience.” Lucy Barr, BSN Candidate ’18

"The most important lesson I learned from the Farmworker Family Health Program is a lesson in appreciation. It is so easy to get swept up in the small stressors of daily life and to lose sight of the many gifts we are given. The farmworkers, however, continuously smiled and were grateful to see us, despite just finishing a fifteen hour day of hard labor out in the sun. They never seemed to let their work conditions, living conditions, or being away from their families get the best of them. Instead, they focused on what they had in the present: companionship with one another and the opportunity to receive some love and attention through our care. Being able to see this first hand definitely made a lasting impact on me. Like the farm workers, I will be grateful for what I do have; I won't worry about what I lack. I joined the program to give back to a population that provides so much, but I ended up receiving so much more." Kari Burdzinski, BSN Candidate'18

“The most important lesson I learned from the Farmworker Family Health Program is a lesson in appreciation. It is so easy to get swept up in the small stressors of daily life and to lose sight of the many gifts we are given. The farmworkers, however, continuously smiled and were grateful to see us, despite just finishing a fifteen hour day of hard labor out in the sun. They never seemed to let their work conditions, living conditions, or being away from their families get the best of them. Instead, they focused on what they had in the present: companionship with one another and the opportunity to receive some love and attention through our care. Being able to see this first hand definitely made a lasting impact on me. Like the farm workers, I will be grateful for what I do have; I won’t worry about what I lack. I joined the program to give back to a population that provides so much, but I ended up receiving so much more.” Kari Burdzinski, BSN Candidate’18

"I feel very fortunate to have been able to attend Moultrie as my first clinical experience and will remember how appreciative these farmworkers were. Moultrie offered me the opportunity to work in an interdisciplinary team with other compassionate and dedicated health care providers. I sincerely hope that Emory continues to send nursing students to help provide care to this deserving population." Grace Pixler, BSN Candidate '18

“I feel very fortunate to have been able to attend Moultrie as my first clinical experience and will remember how appreciative these farmworkers were. Moultrie offered me the opportunity to work in an interdisciplinary team with other compassionate and dedicated health care providers. I sincerely hope that Emory continues to send nursing students to help provide care to this deserving population.” Grace Pixler, BSN Candidate ’18

Jennifer Ratcliffe, BSN:

Being involved with the Moultrie FWFH project for a second time has given depth to my understanding of this population’s circumstances. Their personal stories were heart wrenching and their medical histories will help me remember musculoskeletal disorders, and the effects of pesticides on integumentary and nervous systems, among others.

“This trip taught me to be open to change.” Cathy Wei, BSN Candidate ’18

 

As for me, I am beyond grateful. Grateful to the amazing preceptors and directors of the program. Grateful to the churches, organizations, and people of Moultrie who opened their arms and hearts to us. Grateful to the hotels and other donors in Atlanta who gave us clothes, pillows, toiletries, and various other items to give to the farm workers. Most importantly, I am grateful to the wonderful men and women who endure so much to bring food to our tables so that they may try to provide for their families. Being able to practice what I love while providing a necessary service to an oftentimes overlooked group of people has been such an amazing experience for me. I am so happy that I was one of the special students chosen to participate in this incredible program.

 

-Haja Kanu

 

Day 9 (6/23/16) – No More Night Camps

Day 9 – No More Night Camps

I find it so hard to believe that we are really approaching the end of this program. We spent most of our time today at Cox Elementary packing up our stations and cleaning the classrooms and the gym. It feels like just yesterday we were setting up to see students. It also makes me sad to think that for some of the children, we are the only access they have to healthcare. Some will not get another check-up until next year when the program comes back into town. Being here makes me realize how fortunate I am to be able to see my doctor whenever I am not well or have a health concern. It’s easy to forget that not everyone has that luxury.

Packing up the gym

Packing up the gym

Emory NP students finish up the final charts at Cox Elementary

Emory NP students finish up the final charts at Cox Elementary

Final lunch in Moultrie

Final lunch in Moultrie

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The interdisciplinary team (Emory BSN & NP students in blue scrubs, UGA Pharmacy in red, and Clayton State Dental Hygiene in green scrubs)

The interdisciplinary team (Emory BSN & NP students in blue scrubs, UGA Pharmacy in red, and Clayton State Dental Hygiene in green scrubs)

 

Night camp was not very busy due to the size of the camp that we visited tonight. I was stationed at the blood pressure table again. As I measured my patients’ blood pressures, I thought back to the first time I did the same task last week. I was not used to trying to listen for systolic and diastolic sounds out in a field, surrounded by gnats and loud noises. I found it quite difficult the first time, but now, I feel like a pro. We have developed this saying on the trip: “If you can do it in Moultrie, you can do it anywhere.” We are all a little sad that this was our final night camp. Overall, it has been such a wonderful and educational experience.

The blood pressure team

The blood pressure team

Alejandra checks her patient's blood glucose

Alejandra checks her patient’s blood glucose

– Haja Kanu

 

Day 8 (Wednesday, June 22) – Foot Care Technician by Night

Day 8 – Foot Care Technician by Night

Today, I took another turn at Height, Weight, & BMI. We did not see that many children since most of the students already did rotated through the stations. Because we had a lot of downtime, we began taking inventory of the materials we had at each station. While taking inventory, it began to dawn on me that our time in Moultrie is coming to an end. It feels like just yesterday we were unloading the van and setting up our stations. Time flies!

Setting up the penultimate night camp

Setting up the penultimate night camp

Night camp set-up

Night camp set-up

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After dreading it for a week and a half, I finally got stationed in foot care. But surprisingly, I felt ready. I have been practicing Spanish this whole trip and this was my opportunity to showcase what I had learned. Thankfully, it went well! With my broken Spanish, I was able to learn a few things about the men as I examined and took care of their feet. We spoke about Mexico, their families, and what kind of music they listened to. I even got a few song suggestions for my night camp playlist. I noticed that some men came to the station a little shy and self-conscious, but the more we talked, the more comfortable they seemed. I was happy to know that though my task was not specifically nursing-related, it helped people feel better, which is what nursing is all about.

Selfie with Don Jose (bottom right), an Ellenton Clinic employee

Selfie with Don Jose (bottom right), an Ellenton Clinic employee

 

– Haja Kanu

Day 7 (Tuesday, June 22nd) – Farm Tour & the Realities of Field Work

Day 7 – Farm Tour & the Realities of Field Work

As we are nearing the end of our trip, we assess less and less children at the elementary school.Today I was stationed at the hemoglobin and glucose table again. Because I had been at this station once before, I was not really nervous or worried. I only screened four children, which is so much less than the number of kids I saw last week. Also, because most of the other kids had told their friends how easy the test was, I did not have any criers.

In the afternoon, we had the option of donating blood to the survivors of the unfortunate Pulse Nightclub shootings. Because I am away from home and I have never given blood before and therefore am not sure of the effects it will have on me, I chose not to donate. However, a lot of people from my BSN cohort and the other schools went to a local blood bank to donate. Luckily, most of the people that donated felt fine afterwards.

Karime and Halle rest after giving blood

Karime and Halle rest after giving blood

 

I feel as though I do not write enough about the generosity of the local churches that provide lunch for us every day. Not only is the food always delicious, the people are also very friendly and genuinely happy that we are providing care to those in their community that need it the most. We always feel so welcomed by the church volunteers and so touched that people take time out of their busy schedules to provide for us. Moultrie residents truly have a wonderful sense of community.

BSN students enjoy lunch courtesy of a local church

BSN students enjoy lunch courtesy of a local church

IMG_0825[1] IMG_0823[1]

One exciting thing I got to do today was go on a farm tour. Both of my parents grew up in farming communities and we have a huge garden in our backyard. I’ve always appreciated fresh vegetables, so I was really excited to be able to pick a wide variety of produce FOR FREE! I was one of 12 students on today’s tour, which was guided by employees of the Ellenton Clinic. We all had a blast picking vegetables and taking pictures of the beautiful landscape. However, when we got back into the van, we talked about how hard it was picking vegetables for an hour under a beating sun. We could not even imagine how the migrant farm workers we care for do the same at a much faster pace for a longer period of time. Such hard work greatly contributes to the variety of complaints they present to us everyday.

Alejandra looks for ripe squash

Alejandra looks for ripe squash

Students try their hand at picking vegetables during a farm tour

Students try their hand at picking vegetables during a farm tour

IMG_0831[1]

Today’s night camp made me realize how difficult it can be providing medical services outside of a traditional medical facility. The HemoCue machines we use to check the hemoglobin of our patients overheated several times and had to be taken back to the air-conditioned RV to cool down. During the times the machines were cooling down, we could not assess hemoglobin levels. By the end of the night, none of the glucose machines were functioning properly and we had to close down our station half an hour earlier than originally planned. Had we been in a traditional medical setting, we most likely would not have had a problem with overheating and we could have easily switched machines. However, being out in the field meant we had to be as resourceful as possible or go without. This can be quite frustrating when the patient line grows longer and longer, but we just have to be flexible and keep pushing forward. I love the challenges we are overcoming because they prepare me for real world nursing. If you can make it work in the middle of a 3,000 acre farm in Moultrie, you can make it work anywhere.

– Haja Kanu

Day 5 (Friday, June 17th) – Home-Bound

Day 5 – Home-Bound

I can’t believe it’s really the end of week one! Time is going by much faster than I expected it to. We were only in the elementary school for a couple of hours today because a few children still needed to see physical therapy. The physical therapy students are only here for one week, so they will not be back next week. The dental and pharmacy students are switching out with their peers for week two, so we will have a new set of people next week. The only students that will remain are the NP’s and the BSN’s. Although the Farm Worker Program is hard work, I am really happy to be coming back for a second week. I have learned so much about working in an interdisciplinary team, and it feels really good to know that I am providing a beneficial service to people who otherwise would not be receiving that service. I am also happy that we get the weekend off to go home and recharge for whole new experiences.

End of Week 1 photo

End of Week 1 photo

See you next week, Moultrie!

Day 4 (Thursday, June 16th) – Childhood Obesity

Day 4 – Childhood Obesity

Day camp was a little hard for me today. I worked in the height, weight, and BMI station at the elementary school. As we all know, childhood obesity is becoming a huge problem in America. Childhood obesity is more prevalent in minority populations due to factors such as income disparities and lack of access to healthy food and medical services. However, I saw a lot more overweight and obese children than I expected to see at the elementary school. It really hurt me to see children struggling with weight issues so early in life. I was sad to know that for some children, their parents could not do much to help them lose weight because they may not have the money, time, or knowledge to make better food choices. I learned from my clinical instructor that if the children do not adopt better health habits soon they could carry their poor health practices into adulthood and have a much harder time losing weight.

Graces plots a child's height and weight on a growth chart

Graces plots a child’s height and weight on a growth chart

Karime poses with Dr. Science in the donation room

Karime poses with Dr. Science in the donation room

Haja learns how to hula hoop during down-time

Haja learns how to hula hoop during down-time

A lovely lunch courtesy of a local church

A lovely lunch courtesy of a local church

Lunch at a local church

Lunch at a local church

Tonight’s camp was also a hard experience for me. The farmworkers’ quarters were in very bad shape. The outside of the buildings were decrepit. Trash and beer cans were scattered all about and dogs wandered up and down the area. Worst of all is that children lived there. Seeing the condition in which the workers and their families live really made me realize how important what we are doing is. With such poor living conditions, there is no way they could afford to seek medical services. Their work also depends on their health, so being able to know what health condition they are in is very important to them. Though this experience has been exhausting at times, tonight’s camp refreshed my sense of purpose.

BSN students and clinical instructors pose in front of the Ellenton Clinic van

BSN students and clinical instructors pose in front of the Ellenton Clinic van

Ashley and Jennifer take advantage of the beautiful sunset

Ashley and Jennifer take advantage of the beautiful sunset

Haley, the TA, and her BSN crew

Haley, the TA, and her BSN crew

Day 3 (Wednesday, June 15th) – “It Gets Easier”

Day 3 – “It Gets Easier”

Today felt like a typical day, but it wasn’t until we got back to the hotel from night camp that I realized how smoothly everything had went. I woke up feeling well-rested, despite only getting 4 hours of sleep. I was assigned to the Hemoglobin & Blood Glucose station at the elementary school and had been dreading my shift since I read the assignment schedule on Monday. I, a second year nursing student, dislike being pricked and seeing my own blood, so I dreaded the reaction a six year old may have to the test. I imagined lots of sweat, tears, and of course, blood. I am pleased to say that there was only the latter…for the most part. Most of the kids I tested were a little nervous but put on their big boy and big girl faces when they learned that they could pick out stickers after the test. Most surprisingly was a kindergartener who was excited (yes, you read that correctly) to check his glucose level. Thankfully, there was only one crier today. All the nursing students worked together to calm her down but she refused to be pricked until she saw the procedure demonstrated on my finger. Yes, it hurt a little, but I, too, put on my big girl face and said “see, that was easy.”

Laura demonstrates how to prick a child for a glucose test

Laura demonstrates how to prick a child for a glucose test

 

Tonight’s camp was my favorite experience so far. As I mentioned in my previous posts, I took a little Spanish in high school but am so out of practice that I can barely make a five word sentence. But through a lot of practice with my roommates and the interpreters, I am remembering a lot of what I had forgotten. I was stationed at the blood pressure table in night camp. I was also a little nervous about this assignment because night camp can be noisy, making it hard to listen to and measure systolic and diastolic pressure. To my surprise, this station was also a breeze. Not only was I able to easily obtain blood pressure values, I was also more confident in my Spanish speaking ability. I could tell that my patients really appreciated the fact that I was trying to make them feel more comfortable by speaking their native language, even if I did mistake “esto es su numero” (this is your number) with “esto es su nombre” (this is your name).  Because we had learned that migrant workers do not make much money and therefore buy a lot of cheap and unhealthy food, I was expecting a majority of my patients to have high blood pressure. But in fact, a majority of them had great blood pressure and were in great shape. This makes sense, considering how labor-intensive their work is.

Night camp selfies

Night camp selfies

IMG_0694[1]

Because we had done it four times already, loading and unloading the van was very easy tonight. All teams have become so used to the routine that we were able to see all our patients and leave night camp at 11:30pm.