Archive for Emory Student Nurses Association

Clinical Experience in Emory Midtown Hospital

Xiqin Huang, BSN Junior, BUNDLE Scholar

My name is Xiqin Huang, and I am a junior BSN student in the Emory School of Nursing. I am from Queens, New York.

The clinical rotation is very important component in the nursing education, because it can integrate your knowledge from lectures into real life settings. I had my medical/surgical clinical rotation in Emory Midtown Hospital for past 2 months, and it was a great experience.

My unit is an extremely busy because there are 50 beds with 10 nurses and 5 nurse techs. Also, in this unit, we had a great variety of patients such as COPD, HIV, pressure ulcers etc. During this clinical, I was able to see many diseases processes and nursing interventions that were described my textbooks. Usually, each student is assigned to one patient for the whole clinical rotation and paired up with that patient’s primary nurse. In 1st week in the hospital, I had a fabulous, wonderful nurse who really took her time to welcome and teach me. She asked me to explain all the medication to her. Also, she brought me to watch procedures on other patients that I wasn’t assigned so that I could get to experience new things.

Moreover, in this clinical, I was able to give different medications through different routes such oral, IV, G-tube etc. It was a wonderful learning opportunity to get more exposures in real hospital setting instead of reading books and watching videos. In my very last clinical shift, I was able to observe my patient’s surgical procedure, craniotomy. It is the surgical removal of part of the bone from the skull to expose the brain. And I saw other different types of nurses in operating room. A scrub nurse prepares the operating area by laying out the necessary instruments and equipment. Before each procedure, nurses thoroughly disinfect their hands and arms and then putting on sterile clothing. Under the direction of the surgeon, scrub nurses handle instruments, assist with procedures, and monitor the patient throughout the operation.

Overall, it was a wonderful experience for me in the nursing school, and it made me to become more interested in nursing field.

It’s a PA, It’s a MD, … um it’s a NURSE!

The journey to becoming a nurse was rather unconventional for me. I knew when I began started at Emory College that I wanted to do something that involved being around people, making a difference, and a change of pace every now and then. My experience may be a little different from my fellow colleagues because I transitioned from Emory College to the Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing. My first week was filled with orientation and getting a feel of the college. We had orientation leaders and small group discussion among first-year students. The first few questions were aimed at getting to know one another.

“What is everyone’s perspective major or career track?”

I honestly did not know and I assumed that a few people did not know as well. We were a group of 12, so I was interested to hear what others wanted to do in the future. As everyone went around the circle all I heard was ‘I want to be a doctor.’ This was then followed by someone who said that they assumed that’s how the rest of the circle felt like. I was surprised not because of my peer’s response, but of my orientation leaders lack to facilitate the conversation in a more neutral light. However, this was not a problem that simply remained in my first few weeks of college, but the mindset that if you were not doing medicine then you were doing public health followed me until I came across nursing.

A friend of mine who was thinking about pursuing nursing invited me to sit in on one of their lectures. It was the end of freshman year and I was in a crisis because I simply had no idea what I wanted to do, so I said to myself, “why not?” The lecture we decided to audit was a Patho course and I was hooked as soon as class started. The professor was engaging and even though the class was three hours time seemed to fly. She was not only engaging but showed so much passion for the course that I wanted to take it. Soon after I had a chance to talk to a few of the students and they told me about the ups and downs of nursing school. I appreciated how open and honest they were being with a complete stranger. By the time I left I had made a decision. I was going to pursue nursing as a career because it had so much to offer.

You are probably wondering about my title. This post represents my journey to nursing school and the wall society automatically puts up because you are a nurse. My mom was not against it, but she proceeded to ask me if I was going to use this as an opportunity to go to med school. A few people who I tell that I am a nursing student ask me the same thing. I’m not mad about this, but simply sad that the career does not get the recognition and appreciation that others do simply because of the lack of knowledge most people have about the profession. I honestly do not blame anyone for that. If you are a Grey’s Anatomy fanatic and all that you know about health care is what you see on TV, then I fully expect misconceptions about the roles in a real hospital.

As people I interact with have gained greater exposure to the life of a nursing student, I have seen their appreciation and also respect for my career choice. One of the most memorable days I think a future nurse ever experiences is when a patient truly thanks them for saving their life. Those are the moments I live for. Those moments are what give me the satisfaction that I will someday be a nurse.

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Gloria Alafe is a BSN junior as well as a BUNDLEs Scholar who looks forward towards embracing the diverse field of nursing. Her interest includes pediatric ICU as well as generational PTSD.

Triumph Over Limitations

Jordan Waites, BSN Junior, BUNDLE Scholar

My name is Jordan Waites. I am a Junior in the traditional BSN program. I am an active member of Emory Global Health Nursing Association, Global Medical Missions Alliance, Emory Student Nurses Association, and BUNDLE scholar. I have always enjoyed aiding underserved populations through various volunteer opportunities. I have served in rural areas of New Mexico, Alaska, and Peru. Additionally, I have volunteered at Mommy & Me Family Literacy Program with Friends of Refugees in Clarkston, Georgia. After observing the needs of these populations, my long-term goal is to provide compassionate patient care in the mission field. I am grateful for the opportunities provided by Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing because volunteer work is a true passion of mine. When I found out about an opportunity to volunteer at a weekend camp for families with high-functioning children on the autism spectrum, I felt led to offer my time. I personally felt passionately about this opportunity because I have an adult brother who struggles with Asperger’s Syndrome. I have witnessed society’s negative attitude towards my brother. He is a happy, unsuspecting young man who wants to be accepted. I realize the importance of unconditional love, compassion, and the need for positive collaboration between families and counselors.

As a volunteer “Family Pal,” my task during the weekend camp was to assist families with activities. This allowed me to work very closely with children on the spectrum as well as their family members. As I was exposed to various families, I noticed that although many of the children were on the high-functioning end of the spectrum, they were all unique. Each of them had different struggles and concerns. Many could verbally communicate, whereas some only used 2-3 word sentences. Some could implement problem-solving, however, others experienced anxiety during activity. Throughout the weekend, I heard the quote, “When you meet one child with autism, you only meet ONE child with autism,” and I could not agree more with the statement. The struggles of one child could be another’s strength and vice versa. I learned through my camp experience that children and adults on the autism spectrum require personalized care. I believe that this knowledge is vital to understand as children and adults continue to be diagnosed on the autism spectrum.

I could not be happier that I took advantage of the opportunity that was provided to me by the School of Nursing. I am sure that many of the families who attended are very pleased that they were given the opportunity as well. On the final day of camp, a mother shared with me that her daughter recently had trouble with peers at school. The child would pull her hair out due to frustration and anxiety and children at school would question and mock her. The mother explained to me that camp was an opportunity for her daughter to be around other children who may struggle with the same difficulties. She expressed that the weekend camp was a safe place for her child to triumph over her struggles. In a similar way, volunteering at a weekend camp was a wonderful opportunity for me to step back from the stress of exams and deadlines in nursing school. It was a unique experience that enabled me to make a positive impact in the lives of others. Individuals with disabilities often are stigmatized, encountering not only physical barriers in daily

Individuals with disabilities often are stigmatized, encountering not only physical barriers in daily life but also emotional barriers. Loved ones cannot always protect them from subtle forms of discrimination and prejudice. School-age children with disabilities often have negative school experiences related to their disability. I understand the support families need and the importance of empathetic care. As a nurse, I look forward to providing support and helping families create a positive environment, focusing on their child’s aspirations instead of their limitations.

Caryn’s Big Word

Ariel McKenzie, BSN Candidate 2018, BUNDLE Scholar

The encounter I had with Caryn happened at the International Bible Church in Clarkston, Georgia. My service learning group was delegated the task of encouraging language nutrition amongst refugee mothers and children as a part of the Mommy and Me family literacy program. Encouraging mothers to engage their babies and children as their conversational partners can be difficult when a language barrier already exists between the volunteer and the family. I had the privilege of working with the young toddler class and the ease with which they pick up words boggled my mind at times.

Caryn, a young toddler from Vietnam was one of the more social kids in her group. She would come into class and made sure all the volunteers saw how pretty she looked that day. She played with all the children and chatted away as she moved from station to station. The room was equipped with playing stations that included cars, blocks, a play kitchen, books, and a large box filled with treasures buried in dried black beans. There was a stipulated schedule for each day and play time was the first item on the list. When I came into class on a Thursday morning, I sat down by the cars and train playing station and began talking with the kids. On any given day, few kids even respond to my over-the-top excitement and enthusiasm, but Caryn thought it was so funny. She came and sat at the station with me and we began to play with a green bus. The bus had a Triceratops dinosaur on it and I thought it would be worth a try to see if she could pronounce the word Triceratops. I pointed to the dinosaur and said di-no-saur slowly and clearly. She repeated the word “dinosaur” with ease so I proceeded to say Tri-cer-a-tops. She sounded out the word and within minutes, she was calling every dinosaur in our bucket a Triceratops. I was shocked to say the least. Few kids even spoke to me and here was one that was sounding out a word that some elementary school kids rarely use.

Empirically knowing according to Carper’s fundamental ways of knowing involves scientific, evidenced based practice (Johns, 1995). Approaching our encounter empirically, I acquired some background knowledge through the Talk with Me Baby training that my service learning coordinator organized. Through the training, I learned the importance of engaging children as soon as they’re born as our language partners and promoting language nutrition within the family. The training provided evidenced based methods for language development in children and the results of implementing those methods as early as infancy.

In addition to applying an evidenced based approach during my interaction with Caryn, I applied Carper’s aesthetic way of knowing by grasping the nature of this specific encounter and acting according to what I believed was appropriate (Johns, 1995).  I noticed Caryn’s behavior in class and I knew she was an outgoing, eager learner. She demonstrated no intimidation while happily playing and talking to the other kids in the class. Taking into account her personal attributes, I thought that encouraging her to pronounce a word might benefit her language development. Additionally, the likelihood of Caryn trying to pronounce that word was high based on her natural curiosity.

Carper’s personal way of knowing begins with the nurse firstly knowing herself (John, 1995).  By addressing my prejudices and being willing to set any obstructive biases aside, a smoother interaction with the kids can occur. Having many close friends that came to the United States seeking a better quality of life, I knew that I was biased in Caryn’s favor. I’ve witnessed my own peers struggle to learn English and how successful they’ve been with continual effort. I know learning a second language can be challenging especially when a person is still learning new words in their native language. However, it can be done and I hope for nothing more than to see the students in the literacy program excel in their language development.

Carper’s ethical way of knowing entails differentiating right from wrong and taking appropriate action (John, 1995). After reflecting on the interaction I had with Caryn and my service learning experience in Clarkston, I conclude that the right action was taken. The families that participate in the program want to be there. They want to learn English and skills that will make their transition to living in America easier. This is why I believe encouraging them to reach their maximum potential is the right thing to do. Even though my interaction with Caryn might not seem extremely important in the grand scheme of things, it was. The satisfaction children experience when they successfully grasp a new skill is one even I remember. The least I can do is help kids experience that satisfaction while enhancing their language development.

My service learning experience in Clarkston differed from other experiences I had with people because this time I felt like I was representing something bigger than myself. Not only was I serving on behalf of Emory’s school of nursing, but I was a nurse to those kids. They didn’t know that I’m only in my first semester of nursing school. I was wearing nurse’s scrubs, so, therefore, I was a nurse. Our service learning group might have been the first nurses the kids encountered since moving here and I really wanted them to feel safe and happy around us so trust could be established instead of fear as early as possible. I’d like to think that with every human encounter that I have while I’m in uniform that I have the opportunity to increase a person’s trust in health care workers. The techniques I used to guide the conversation were building rapport, smiling, over enunciate, and offering positive reassurance. These techniques were helpful because the kids were very young and they often shy away from adults if they sense the person is unenthused. Hopefully, the program will continue to thrive and Caryn’s vocabulary will continue to grow.


References

Johns, C. (1995). Framing learning through reflection within Carper’s fundamental ways of knowing in nursing. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 22(2), 226-234. doi:10.1046/j.1365-2648.1995.22020226.x

Congratulations Women’s Health Class of 2016 Graduates

Congratulations Emory University School of Nursing Class of 2016 graduates

(from left) Women’s Health Class of 2016 graduates Tiffanye Williams, Jasmine McCorkle, and Jenna Dannenbaum

The School of Nursing’s Women’s Health program celebrated Class of 2016 graduates, current, and future students in a magical winter wonderland complete with plenty of sparkle, candle light, and snow.

Participants enjoyed the sites, sounds, and treats of the season, while competing in a tacky holiday sweater competition, posing in the holiday photo booth, and leaving messages and well-wishes for graduates and current students. The event was organized by Program Coordinator Trisha Sheridan.

On the evening before the Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing’s Winter Awards Ceremony, graduates look forward to the future.

Jasmine McCorkle

Why I chose Women’s Health:
I chose women’s Health because I have a passion for helping women. I was originally a labor and deliver nurse, but I would only see my patients for a brief period of time. With primary care I will be able to see them long-term and, hopefully, make a lasting impact on their lives.

Tiffanye Williams
Why I chose Women’s Health:
I was a nurse for about 7.5 years and a travel nurse for about 4.5 years. I had some case management experience for about a year and a half. Throughout my career I discovered that I had a strong passion for helping women and wanted to specialize in Women’s Health.
Plans after Graduation: Besides working…in the near future I would like to open my own clinic for women’s health.

Jenna Dannenbaum
Why I chose Women’s Health
: I was a labor and deliver nurse prior to this in the Atlanta area. I am interested in increasing access to contraception for women and helping women be more educated about their bodies and make more informed decisions about their health throughout their lifespans.
Plans after graduation: After graduation, I am hoping to work in a private practice setting under a good team of doctors whom I can collaborate with and show them what nurse practitioners have to offer.

Learn more about the Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner specialty from current students.


5 Tips to Successfully Apply to Top Nursing Schools

emorynursingapplicationtipsWith careers in nursing booming, getting into a top-notch nursing program has become a competitive endeavor. According to a report by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, U.S. nursing schools turned away 68,938 qualified applicants away because of the high demand for nursing education.

Nursing is a rewarding and challenging field with dozens of specialties. Talented nurses hailing from the nation’s most prestigious nursing schools are able to find work in their field at hospitals and in doctors’ offices all over the country.

If you’re interested in choosing nursing for your career, your next step is to put together a strong application to impress the programs you’re interested in. Feeling nervous about getting it all done? Try these tips to get organized and successfully apply to top nursing schools.

1. Do Your Research

Before you apply, study up on what each program offers to make sure your preferred specialties, learning styles and locations are covered. You’ll also want to visit the campus to get a sense of what life there is like.

2. Apply to More Than One School

Rank your favorites, and apply to your personal top three to five programs. If you get accepted to more than one, you’ll be able to compare and contrast the programs and any financial aid packages to make an informed decision.

3. Apply Early

This is especially important if you’re looking at a program with a rolling admissions process — you don’t want all the spaces to be filled before you send in your application! Applying early gives the admissions committee time to consider your application and may give you a leg up on getting scholarship money. Scholarship awards are awarded generously to applicants who apply before the priority scholarship deadline.

4. Be Yourself

Admissions committees look to create diverse student bodies, so be sure to list all your previous jobs, extracurricular activities, volunteer work and any other unique leadership roles you’ve taken on. Let your personality shine through in your application. You can bring your application to life by giving the admission committee the chance to get to know you. Most schools offer Open Houses, Virtual Webinars, Facebook Chats, and Shadow Days. These are all excellent ways for you to get to know the school and for the school to get to know you.

5. Proofread

While showing off your unique style is a good thing, irregular spelling and grammar are not. Be sure to carefully edit and proofread your full application to avoid careless mistakes. These may be innocent, but they show a lack of attention to detail that points to a lack of effort — and a quick rejection.

Next Steps

As you research top nursing programs, be sure to check out Emory University’s Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing. Emory makes it easy to schedule a visit and learn more about its programs through information sessions. When you’re ready, try Emory’s new online application to the nursing program. It’s quick, it’s easy, and it takes less than 30 minutes to get started on your future today.

What NOT to Wear, Emory Edition

When I started nursing school last fall at Emory, one of the more confusing topics (aside from Pathophysiology) was the dress code for clinical and lab settings. I had heard from other students that it was allowable to wear certain articles of clothing or shoes, while the student handbook stated differently.

First thing’s first: When in doubt, GO BY THE STUDENT HANDBOOK! If you are ever questioning whether or not you are appropriately attired for clinical or lab refer to the written guidelines.

Below is your basic uniform for clinical and lab. Honestly, this is all you need (plus white socks!). The simpler, the better.

IMG_6635Here are some tips on what NOT to wear in the lab or clinical setting:

1. Nail Polish/Fake Nails. Trust me on this one, y’all. You will want to be able to see what is under those finger nails after a 12 hour shift of wound care. Also, fake nails are known to slice through gloves and get lost in patients’ bed sheets (yuck!)

2. Your Hair Down. Tie that hair back! The last thing you want is your hair dragging through a patient’s wound or blocking your eyesight while trying to insert an IV. It’s a good idea to always carry extra hair ties and clips.

3. Tattoos. Emory requires that you cover up any visible tattoos while you are in the lab and at your clinical sites. I’ve seen some pretty creative ways to cover up a tattoo, but I’ve heard that bandaids usually work the best. However, some people use makeup as well depending on the size and placement of the tattoo. It would be best to do some trial and error to discover what works before your first day of lab.

4. Long Sleeve Shirts Under Your Scrub Top. Coming from someone who is permanently cold, this can be very difficult. However, it is against the guidelines to wear a long-sleeve shirt under your scrub top for sanitary purposes. Instead, you can purchase a navy blue or white cuffed long-sleeved jacket to keep you warm in lab or at your clinical sites. Uniform Advantage has cuffed, long-sleeved jackets available and you can get our logo embroidered on it through them.

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5. Jewelry that Dangles….Or Jewelry in General. For the most part, wearing jewelry at lab or in clinical is not a good idea. Anything that dangles from your wrist, your neck, or your ears is bound to get caught on something or worse, caught IN something (*shudders*). Rings can also cause a problem as they can easily slice through gloves. A good rule of thumb is just to leave your jewelry at home where it is safe and out of the way. One small stud per ear is okay, and wedding bands are permissible. Do not, I repeat, do not wear your engagement ring to lab or clinical! I heard a horrible story about a nursing student who lost the stone from her engagement ring while changing a patient’s bed and it was never found.

6. Your Workout Sneakers. While at your clinical sites you are going to step in some gross stuff and even more gross stuff is going to spill on your shoes (I speak from unfortunate experience). You want to wear shoes that are durable and can easily be washed. Get some comfortable, solid white or black leather or vinyl shoes and leave your sneakers at home. Once again, Uniform Advantage has a great shoe selection, but there are other shopping options (such as Amazon) that you can explore.

7. Jeans. I know, I know, this one seems obvious, but it needs to be said. There will be times when you will need to wear your long, white lab coat and under that lab coat can be a) your Emory scrubs or b) business casual attire. NO JEANS! See below for some appropriate examples.

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8. Open-Toed Shoes. One of the most painful experiences that I have had is a gurney rolling over my toes, and I was wearing close-toed shoes. Imagine if they had been open….needless to say, all shoes must be close-toed in the lab and in the clinical setting.

9. Forgetting Your ID Badge. You need to have your ID badge with you AT ALL TIMES in the lab and at the clinical sites. That badge is your lifeline and it helps to identify you as an Emory student. It helps you get in and out of parking garages, medication rooms, and hospital units, just to name a few. It is costly to replace and difficult to go a day without, so be diligent about keeping it within reach.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Graduate Immersion Experience During West Virginia Flooding

Flooded streets and businesses in Clendenin, West Virginia

Graduate students in the School of Nursing’s Nurse Practitioner program Phil Dillard (Emergency) and Abby Wetzel (Nurse-Midwifery) discuss their immersion program experience with Cabin Creek Health Systems. The students worked alongside staff of the Clendenin Clinic to evacuate medically-fragile residents during the region’s recent storms and devastating flooding. Cabin Creek is a federally-qualified health center that provides essential health services to vulnerable populations in rural West Virginia through several community-based clinics.

 

Graduate Students Reflect on Immersion Experience during West Virginia Flooding

WV_Houses

School of Nursing graduate students participate every year in a two-week immersion program in West Virginia through the Lillian Carter Center for Global Health and Social Responsibility. Our students work in partnership with area federally-qualified community health centers to promote health and prevent disease throughout the region. Led by faculty Advisors Carolyn Clevenger and Debbie Gunter, students Andrea Brubaker, Phillip Dillard, Kimberly Eggleston, Hannah Ng, Jill Peters, Allysa Rueschenberg, and Abigail Wetzel, were providing essential health services through four community clinics located in cities to the north and south of Charleston. Two of our students, Phil Dillard and Abby Wetzel, were working in a clinic in Clendenin, a town 25 miles northeast of Charleston that was hit hard by the storms.

Phil Dillard discusses the experience in this WSB-TV Channel 2 interview. WSB Interview – West Virginia Flooding

Admission and Access

At Emory University, we pride ourselves on the mixture of people,beliefs, values, and social circles that make up our campus community. Diversity is multidimensional, leading to a community composed not only of different ethnicities, races, and religions, but also different social backgrounds, geographic locations, and life experiences.

As we shape an incoming class, we look for students who will build upon the campus’ already rich landscape. This is not always easy. High-achieving students come from all family back- grounds as well as from both rural and urban communities. Many student populations are underrepresented or come from families unfamiliar with the college search and application process and who have little access to resources to help them.

Through strategic initiatives, we seek to provide students of all backgrounds many opportunities to experience Emory’s campus and student body, learn about our rigorous programs, and successfully enroll upon admission.

QUESTBRIDGE
QuestBridge (questbridge.org) is a national non-profit organization connecting the nation’s brightest, underserved students with leading higher education institutions. They aim to increase the percentage of low-in-come students attending the nation’s best universities, and Emory University is one of 37 partner institutions for their College Match program.

This year Emory received 1,708 QuestBridge admission applications (up from 1,431 last year) and ultimately narrowed that list down to those students who will become part of the Emory Class of 2020. Last year nearly a hundred QuestBridge applicants did so. Additionally, six QuestBridge Scholars were selected to join the Class of 2020.

In July 2015, Emory also hosted a QuestBridge Conference, welcoming approximately 200 students and their families from across the nation. The role of the conference was to educate guests on the QuestBridge application process as well as introduce them to each of the (then) 36 partner universities. Hosting the conference allowed us to showcase the university and introduce families to the opportunities of Atlanta as well. Emory has recently been selected to host another Quest- Bridge Conference in the summer of 2017, and the Office of Admission welcomes this great opportunity!

ESSENCE
Essence is a fly-in program held in the spring for admitted African American and Latino students. Typically these students have been admitted to several selective universities from across the country. This year approximately 100 students will spend two nights and three days experiencing residence halls, engaging with current students, and exploring campus. The program will take place April 14 to 16.

CORE
CORE (http://coalitionforcollegeaccess.org) was first held in the fall of 2014 for high-achieving high school seniors who are either first-generation college applicants and/or from underrepresented or low socioeconomic backgrounds. This year 60 students were selected to participate in the fly-in program (up from 55 last year). Arriving from across the nation for three days and two nights, students sat in on class faculty lectures, participated in campus life, and learned about the application and financial aid processes. We also hosted a COREtural Night, where a wide variety of individual students and diversity- focused clubs performed, showcasing the wide range of what diversity means at Emory.

COALITION APPLICATION
(http://coalitionforcollegeaccess.org)

In an unprecedented move, a group of over 90 diverse public and private colleges and universities have formed a partnership to reframe the college application process, starting with the Class of 2021. Current Coalition schools include Emory, Duke, Dartmouth, Columbia, Harvard, Yale, Ohio, State, Michigan, Princeton, Wake Forest, and Vanderbilt, just to name a few.

The Coalition is developing a free platform of online tools to streamline the college application experience as well as allow students to curate a “locker” of their academic and non-academic accomplishments. The Coalition seeks to put the student first, promote access to underserved populations, and innovate the college application process for students and their families.

The first iteration of the Coalition platform will go live in April 2016. Beginning in fall 2016, Emory University will accept the new Coalition Application and continue to accept the Common Application and the QuestBridge Application.

Each of these programs and platforms is designed to provide students with hands-on, true-to-life college experiences as well as provide the tools they need to succeed in the college application process. Our desire is to build a relationship with each student and help coach them through what otherwise may be seen as an overwhelming endeavor—applying to a rigorous institution like Emory. Each year we see many unique students enroll as a result of these initiatives, and we look forward to seeing what the Emory Class of 2020 will bring.
– Lisa Coetzee, Communications Manger
Reprinted with permission from The Admission Review

Emory QuestBridge Scholars
Six outstanding students were selected as QuestBridge Scholars in December 2015, becoming the very first members of the Class of 2020. Along with being strong academically, these students are also actively involved in their high schools and communities. The QuestBridge Scholars will will join the Emory community this fall and begin to make their mark both inside and outside the classroom. Here’s what a few of the students had to say.

Miranda Krist
Mesa, Ariz.
Intended Major: Nursing
Dream Job: Not sure yet.
My proudest moment so far is getting accepted to Emory! (It sounds a little cliche, but I’m serious!) I’m also really proud of being accepted, as a sophomore, to the Arizona All State Choir. I was so excited because I had worked so hard on preparing my audition. It was a fantastic experience


Nate SnyderNate Snyder
Gastonia, NC

Intended Major: Nursing
Dream Job: Chief Nursing Officer
My proudest academic achievement thus far was attending the North Carolina Governor’s School, a highly-selective summer residential academic program for the elite students of the state, the oldest of its kind in the U.S. I’ve also been selected as a principal dancer at Gaston Dance Theatre, performing lead roles in shows such as The Nutcracker, West Side Story, and Wicked.