Archive for Learning Opportunity

Triumph Over Limitations

Jordan Waites, BSN Junior, BUNDLE Scholar

My name is Jordan Waites. I am a Junior in the traditional BSN program. I am an active member of Emory Global Health Nursing Association, Global Medical Missions Alliance, Emory Student Nurses Association, and BUNDLE scholar. I have always enjoyed aiding underserved populations through various volunteer opportunities. I have served in rural areas of New Mexico, Alaska, and Peru. Additionally, I have volunteered at Mommy & Me Family Literacy Program with Friends of Refugees in Clarkston, Georgia. After observing the needs of these populations, my long-term goal is to provide compassionate patient care in the mission field. I am grateful for the opportunities provided by Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing because volunteer work is a true passion of mine. When I found out about an opportunity to volunteer at a weekend camp for families with high-functioning children on the autism spectrum, I felt led to offer my time. I personally felt passionately about this opportunity because I have an adult brother who struggles with Asperger’s Syndrome. I have witnessed society’s negative attitude towards my brother. He is a happy, unsuspecting young man who wants to be accepted. I realize the importance of unconditional love, compassion, and the need for positive collaboration between families and counselors.

As a volunteer “Family Pal,” my task during the weekend camp was to assist families with activities. This allowed me to work very closely with children on the spectrum as well as their family members. As I was exposed to various families, I noticed that although many of the children were on the high-functioning end of the spectrum, they were all unique. Each of them had different struggles and concerns. Many could verbally communicate, whereas some only used 2-3 word sentences. Some could implement problem-solving, however, others experienced anxiety during activity. Throughout the weekend, I heard the quote, “When you meet one child with autism, you only meet ONE child with autism,” and I could not agree more with the statement. The struggles of one child could be another’s strength and vice versa. I learned through my camp experience that children and adults on the autism spectrum require personalized care. I believe that this knowledge is vital to understand as children and adults continue to be diagnosed on the autism spectrum.

I could not be happier that I took advantage of the opportunity that was provided to me by the School of Nursing. I am sure that many of the families who attended are very pleased that they were given the opportunity as well. On the final day of camp, a mother shared with me that her daughter recently had trouble with peers at school. The child would pull her hair out due to frustration and anxiety and children at school would question and mock her. The mother explained to me that camp was an opportunity for her daughter to be around other children who may struggle with the same difficulties. She expressed that the weekend camp was a safe place for her child to triumph over her struggles. In a similar way, volunteering at a weekend camp was a wonderful opportunity for me to step back from the stress of exams and deadlines in nursing school. It was a unique experience that enabled me to make a positive impact in the lives of others. Individuals with disabilities often are stigmatized, encountering not only physical barriers in daily

Individuals with disabilities often are stigmatized, encountering not only physical barriers in daily life but also emotional barriers. Loved ones cannot always protect them from subtle forms of discrimination and prejudice. School-age children with disabilities often have negative school experiences related to their disability. I understand the support families need and the importance of empathetic care. As a nurse, I look forward to providing support and helping families create a positive environment, focusing on their child’s aspirations instead of their limitations.

Countdown to Zero: Defeating Disease

Tyra Skinner, BSN Junior, BUNDLE Scholar

This past Saturday, I decided to take a break from studying to visit the Carter Center. I was really excited to see what the Carter Center had for me to learn and absorb but I was most excited about the Countdown to Zero: Defeating Disease exhibition. The exhibit is fairly new to Atlanta and focuses on diseases that plagued many parts of the world and tracked their journey to eradication.

There were walls full of information about guinea worm disease, malaria, small pox, polio, trachoma and a few other diseases that are currently in the process of being eliminated or eradicated. Each disease had pictures and information about prevention, methods of transmission and the manifestations of the diseases on an individual and the community. According to the Countdown to Zero: Defeating Disease brochure, guinea worm disease could become the second human disease to ever be eradicated, with smallpox being the first.

What’s so hard about eradicating a disease? Don’t you just wash your hands and use clean water? Well obviously, it’s a little more complicated than that. Scientists have been working for decades just to control or eliminate some of these diseases. Disease eradication is one of the biggest challenges to public health and there are a number of reasons why some disease cannot be eradicated.

Measles is one of the most contagious, deadly disease that we still see today and is also eradicable. Even though, vaccines are reliable and common, there has been a rise in the number of cases in recent years. Increased disapproval of vaccines and lack of economic and governmental support has led to less children receiving the measles vaccine, leading to setbacks to the eradication of measles.

One tricky part about disease eradication is that not all diseases can able to be completely wiped out of existence. For example, Influenza is a common disease that is often brought to the public’s attention around fall and spring every year. It is also a disease that does not fit the criteria for eradication. Why? There are many different strains of the disease that mutates frequently so a vaccine that worked last year may not work the next year. Trachoma, a bacterial disease that spread through eye-seeking flies, is also not eradicable but the blindness that is caused by the disease can be treated with a surgery.

A part of the exhibit that really caught my eye was an educational flipbook from South Sudan that was made from cloth instead of paper. The book didn’t have any words on it and was bound more like a scroll than an actual flipbook. The one picture that I could see illustrated the proper filtering technique that is now utilized in many villages in Africa to filter water, preventing the transmission of pathogens like the guinea worm. Villagers place a cloth with a semi-permeable section in the middle on top of a bucket and pour water over it to make the water drinkable. Cloth was used instead of paper or cardboard books because paper and cardboard are not able to withstand the conditions of the fields in the most commonly affected areas.

The Carter Center had other exhibits that focus on the many great things that Former President Jimmy Carter and his wife, Rosalynn Carter, have contributed to public health, global affairs and policy during his presidency and years after. I highly recommended checking it out, especially viewing the Countdown to Zero: Defeating Disease exhibit.

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Tyra Skinner is a traditional BSN student at Emory’s School of Nursing. She serves as a mentor and team leader for the Health Career Academy and is also a part of the BUNDLE program.

How Nursing School Showed Me a Difference World

Elizabeth Balogun, BSN Class of 2017, BUNDLE Scholar

Whenever I get the question “Why did you choose nursing school?”, I almost always respond with my usual, “You know, it just kind of happened.” That question takes me back a bit and makes me think about why I chose nursing and how I got here. Occasionally I even think back to an information session where we were presented with the wide varieties of undergraduate studies at Emory. I remember that I turned to my friend, and laughed at the idea of becoming a nurse. Although it often feels like nursing school was just something that just happened to me, I sure am glad that it happened. I am glad that I tagged along with my friend to a pre-nursing club “Meet the Juniors” event that got me thinking about nursing school. I am glad that this profession, that is rooted in caring, found me.On my very first day of classes in nursing school I hoped and prayed that I had made the right decision, and I have found over the course of my four semesters here that I am indeed in the right place. I did not know much about public or global health or the role of nurses in those settings until I got to nursing school. I did know, even before nursing school, that I would like to spend my career providing care in any way I could to anyone who needs it. As a scholar in the Building Nursing’s Diverse Leadership at Emory (BUNDLE) program I have learned about public health nursing, the need for cultural diversity and awareness in nursing and nursing care, and being a nurse leader and a force for change. Between my classes and my BUNDLE experience I found that I wanted to be a public or global health nurse. My alternative winter break trip to Montego Bay, Jamaica (which I was on the fence about going to) really confirmed that for me.Upon arrival in Montego Bay, we were on the road and ready to take on our first project a few hours after arriving. I had never been happier and filled with a greater sense of fulfillment while immensely exhausted as I was on this trip. We were gone from early in the morning to late at night setting up clinics in churches, teaching reproductive health, doing yoga with hearing impaired students and so much more. One of many profound moments for me was when a man who had visited our church clinic came back with a bunch of plantains for a student who had taken his blood pressure to show thanks for the care he received. Our clinic on that day simply offered blood pressure and glucose checks, BMI calculation, some health education, and a few incentives such as anti-fungal cream and reading glasses. These are things that do not seem like much to us in the United States, but a farmer in rural Jamaica valued these simple things so much that he was willing to give us his produce as a token of appreciation.This experience solidified my goal to become a public/global health nurse. It reminded me that there are people around the world, and even in the United States, who do not have the resources that we take for granted. Whenever I think back to the experience, I want to continue to strive toward the goal of sharing the skills and knowledge that I have been fortunate enough to gain through my nursing school experience and training. I want to use these skills to empower others around the world to take charge of their health. I hope to continue to learn and push myself as an individual and a nurse from my experiences with the diverse groups of people I encounter.

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Elizabeth Balogun is a BSN 2017 student and a BUNDLE scholar. She is from Lawrenceville, Georgia and hopes to become a public/global health nurse providing care for low resource and underserved populations around the world.

Caryn’s Big Word

Ariel McKenzie, BSN Candidate 2018, BUNDLE Scholar

The encounter I had with Caryn happened at the International Bible Church in Clarkston, Georgia. My service learning group was delegated the task of encouraging language nutrition amongst refugee mothers and children as a part of the Mommy and Me family literacy program. Encouraging mothers to engage their babies and children as their conversational partners can be difficult when a language barrier already exists between the volunteer and the family. I had the privilege of working with the young toddler class and the ease with which they pick up words boggled my mind at times.

Caryn, a young toddler from Vietnam was one of the more social kids in her group. She would come into class and made sure all the volunteers saw how pretty she looked that day. She played with all the children and chatted away as she moved from station to station. The room was equipped with playing stations that included cars, blocks, a play kitchen, books, and a large box filled with treasures buried in dried black beans. There was a stipulated schedule for each day and play time was the first item on the list. When I came into class on a Thursday morning, I sat down by the cars and train playing station and began talking with the kids. On any given day, few kids even respond to my over-the-top excitement and enthusiasm, but Caryn thought it was so funny. She came and sat at the station with me and we began to play with a green bus. The bus had a Triceratops dinosaur on it and I thought it would be worth a try to see if she could pronounce the word Triceratops. I pointed to the dinosaur and said di-no-saur slowly and clearly. She repeated the word “dinosaur” with ease so I proceeded to say Tri-cer-a-tops. She sounded out the word and within minutes, she was calling every dinosaur in our bucket a Triceratops. I was shocked to say the least. Few kids even spoke to me and here was one that was sounding out a word that some elementary school kids rarely use.

Empirically knowing according to Carper’s fundamental ways of knowing involves scientific, evidenced based practice (Johns, 1995). Approaching our encounter empirically, I acquired some background knowledge through the Talk with Me Baby training that my service learning coordinator organized. Through the training, I learned the importance of engaging children as soon as they’re born as our language partners and promoting language nutrition within the family. The training provided evidenced based methods for language development in children and the results of implementing those methods as early as infancy.

In addition to applying an evidenced based approach during my interaction with Caryn, I applied Carper’s aesthetic way of knowing by grasping the nature of this specific encounter and acting according to what I believed was appropriate (Johns, 1995).  I noticed Caryn’s behavior in class and I knew she was an outgoing, eager learner. She demonstrated no intimidation while happily playing and talking to the other kids in the class. Taking into account her personal attributes, I thought that encouraging her to pronounce a word might benefit her language development. Additionally, the likelihood of Caryn trying to pronounce that word was high based on her natural curiosity.

Carper’s personal way of knowing begins with the nurse firstly knowing herself (John, 1995).  By addressing my prejudices and being willing to set any obstructive biases aside, a smoother interaction with the kids can occur. Having many close friends that came to the United States seeking a better quality of life, I knew that I was biased in Caryn’s favor. I’ve witnessed my own peers struggle to learn English and how successful they’ve been with continual effort. I know learning a second language can be challenging especially when a person is still learning new words in their native language. However, it can be done and I hope for nothing more than to see the students in the literacy program excel in their language development.

Carper’s ethical way of knowing entails differentiating right from wrong and taking appropriate action (John, 1995). After reflecting on the interaction I had with Caryn and my service learning experience in Clarkston, I conclude that the right action was taken. The families that participate in the program want to be there. They want to learn English and skills that will make their transition to living in America easier. This is why I believe encouraging them to reach their maximum potential is the right thing to do. Even though my interaction with Caryn might not seem extremely important in the grand scheme of things, it was. The satisfaction children experience when they successfully grasp a new skill is one even I remember. The least I can do is help kids experience that satisfaction while enhancing their language development.

My service learning experience in Clarkston differed from other experiences I had with people because this time I felt like I was representing something bigger than myself. Not only was I serving on behalf of Emory’s school of nursing, but I was a nurse to those kids. They didn’t know that I’m only in my first semester of nursing school. I was wearing nurse’s scrubs, so, therefore, I was a nurse. Our service learning group might have been the first nurses the kids encountered since moving here and I really wanted them to feel safe and happy around us so trust could be established instead of fear as early as possible. I’d like to think that with every human encounter that I have while I’m in uniform that I have the opportunity to increase a person’s trust in health care workers. The techniques I used to guide the conversation were building rapport, smiling, over enunciate, and offering positive reassurance. These techniques were helpful because the kids were very young and they often shy away from adults if they sense the person is unenthused. Hopefully, the program will continue to thrive and Caryn’s vocabulary will continue to grow.


References

Johns, C. (1995). Framing learning through reflection within Carper’s fundamental ways of knowing in nursing. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 22(2), 226-234. doi:10.1046/j.1365-2648.1995.22020226.x

Montego Bay: 16 nursing students, two professors and one breast model take Mobay

DAY 1| The bustling of the footsteps resonated throughout the Atlanta International Airport. All 16 of us arrived with high anticipation. Dr. Muirhead and Dr. Horigan, our two faculty instructors, directed as we quickly checked in eight packed suitcases of medical supplies and incentives (blood glucose monitors, gloves, band aids, hygiene kits, glasses, lotion, etc). We promptly started walking through TSA security with no concern or doubt that we would be stopped. However, we were completely wrong. Although most of us walked through smoothly, Dria (ABSN ’17) confidently knew that she would be stopped. “I just knew it,” she said as she shook her head after the incident. The red lights immediately flashed as her luggage passed through the security scanner. The TSA officer started searching through her personal items before pulling out the breast model she had for her breast self exam presentation. The officer’s eyebrows raised as she questioned, “what is this?” Without a second thought, Dria went nurse mode and preceded to educate her about breast exams. She even encouraged her to perform her own self exams and emphasized the importance of it. By the end of the conversation, Dria walked away with not only her breast model but also with the satisfaction about her premature patient education. We knew right then that this would be a good trip.

When we finally made it to Jamaica, we went straight to work. After refueling our energy with food, we took two hours packing first aid kits as incentives for our very first event! After designating leaders for this event, we headed over to The Church of God to speak with the individuals about the health related issues in Jamaica and Montego Bay.

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Elianne Carroll (ABSN ’17) and Fauziya Ali (BSN ’17) created and executed the health module about the Zika virus. The ladies of the church listened intently as they followed them through their poster. In order to guide their understanding, we also provided them with an educational handout that had additional information to address any concerns.

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After the presentation, we provided free blood pressure screenings and patient education. Dr. Muirhead floated around to assist and provided further patient education about actions individuals could take in order to help lower their blood pressure. Each participant received a gift bag with deodorant, anti-fungal cream, and their own personal first aid kit. The ladies and specifically the kids at the event enjoyed both the information and our presence.

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We returned to the hotel in good spirits and hungry. After eating, debriefing, learning about hypertension education tips, and creating aromatherapy rice bags, we went straight to our rooms to say hello to our beds. FIRST DAY, SUCCESS.

 

Spring Workshop Series: R and RStudio

The School of Nursing is excited to announce a “Series of R Workshops” to be held Spring 2016. These 4 workshops will be led by Melinda Higgins, Ph.D., associate research professor and senior biostatistician.

These 4 workshops will each be 2 hours long with a focus on hands-on learning using R and RStudio. These workshops will be introductory and provide skills necessary to begin to be comfortable working with R and RStudio performing data analysis and writing research reports. R is a wonderful programming language for Data Analysis, Graphics and much more.

“However, with great power comes great responsibility!”

R has a steep learning curve. It was not designed to have a point-and-click menu driven interface with canned procedures. Instead it is a rich language for data manipulation and analysis with statistical functions and methods embedded in its core. The rewards are definitely worth the effort. PLUS, IT IS FREE and is supported by literally hundreds of thousands of users and developers worldwide. No other widely-used software can make these claims.

The 4 workshops listed below will be held in the Nursing building room 112 from 10:00-11:50am on each date listed. More Information at http://tinyurl.com/jfwkau7

Four R Workshops and Projected Goals

2/17/2016  “Introduction to R, RStudio and Working in the R Environment”

  • Goal 1: Be able to open and work with R and RStudio on your own computer (or one you have access to) – initial familiarization with R, RStudio interface and R Environment
  • Goal 2: Initial understanding of what “packages” are, how to load them and use them
  • Goal 3: Initial understanding of where and how to get help

2/19/2016 “Introductory Data Management, Statistical Analyses, and Graphics with R” — Register Now

  • Goal 1: Further improvement of skills for working with R, the RStudio interface and configuring your R Environment
  • Goal 2: Read data into and Save data and results out of R/RStudio
  • Goal 3: Run simple statistical summaries and analyses and make simple plots

3/25/2016 “Reproducible Research with R (combining data + analysis + documentation seamlessly)

  • Goal 1: Initial understanding of what Reproducible Research practices are and why they are important
  • Goal 2: Initial understanding of RMarkdown and how to use it to create HTML, PDF or Microsoft WORD formatted reports
  • Goal 3: Initial understanding of “cloud-based” repositories for interacting with and storing data, statistical results, and associated documentation.

4/22/2016 “Getting Started with Statistical Modeling with R”

  • Goal 1: Initial understanding of primary data structures and objects within R
  • Goal 2: Initial understanding of running descriptive univariate and bivariate statistics
  • Goal 3: Initial understanding of simple statistical tests such as t-tests, chi-square tests and linear regression models

There is a video tutorial/how to for downloading R and RStudio and associated programs plus showing how to get these installed, running and configured for the R Workshop series this Spring (this is for Windows, but info is shown where to get the files for a mac as well). This video also includes a brief introduction to using RMarkdown for creating HTML, PDF and Word Documents where the report, code and all statistical analyses are performed in 1 step (a teaser if you will for workshop 3 which will focus on RMarkdown and the process of dynamic documentation and how that supports Reproducible Research).

The video tutorial is now posted YouTube at https://youtu.be/wvzSz2_iPew