Day 7 (Tuesday, June 22nd) – Farm Tour & the Realities of Field Work

Day 7 – Farm Tour & the Realities of Field Work

As we are nearing the end of our trip, we assess less and less children at the elementary school.Today I was stationed at the hemoglobin and glucose table again. Because I had been at this station once before, I was not really nervous or worried. I only screened four children, which is so much less than the number of kids I saw last week. Also, because most of the other kids had told their friends how easy the test was, I did not have any criers.

In the afternoon, we had the option of donating blood to the survivors of the unfortunate Pulse Nightclub shootings. Because I am away from home and I have never given blood before and therefore am not sure of the effects it will have on me, I chose not to donate. However, a lot of people from my BSN cohort and the other schools went to a local blood bank to donate. Luckily, most of the people that donated felt fine afterwards.

Karime and Halle rest after giving blood

Karime and Halle rest after giving blood

 

I feel as though I do not write enough about the generosity of the local churches that provide lunch for us every day. Not only is the food always delicious, the people are also very friendly and genuinely happy that we are providing care to those in their community that need it the most. We always feel so welcomed by the church volunteers and so touched that people take time out of their busy schedules to provide for us. Moultrie residents truly have a wonderful sense of community.

BSN students enjoy lunch courtesy of a local church

BSN students enjoy lunch courtesy of a local church

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One exciting thing I got to do today was go on a farm tour. Both of my parents grew up in farming communities and we have a huge garden in our backyard. I’ve always appreciated fresh vegetables, so I was really excited to be able to pick a wide variety of produce FOR FREE! I was one of 12 students on today’s tour, which was guided by employees of the Ellenton Clinic. We all had a blast picking vegetables and taking pictures of the beautiful landscape. However, when we got back into the van, we talked about how hard it was picking vegetables for an hour under a beating sun. We could not even imagine how the migrant farm workers we care for do the same at a much faster pace for a longer period of time. Such hard work greatly contributes to the variety of complaints they present to us everyday.

Alejandra looks for ripe squash

Alejandra looks for ripe squash

Students try their hand at picking vegetables during a farm tour

Students try their hand at picking vegetables during a farm tour

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Today’s night camp made me realize how difficult it can be providing medical services outside of a traditional medical facility. The HemoCue machines we use to check the hemoglobin of our patients overheated several times and had to be taken back to the air-conditioned RV to cool down. During the times the machines were cooling down, we could not assess hemoglobin levels. By the end of the night, none of the glucose machines were functioning properly and we had to close down our station half an hour earlier than originally planned. Had we been in a traditional medical setting, we most likely would not have had a problem with overheating and we could have easily switched machines. However, being out in the field meant we had to be as resourceful as possible or go without. This can be quite frustrating when the patient line grows longer and longer, but we just have to be flexible and keep pushing forward. I love the challenges we are overcoming because they prepare me for real world nursing. If you can make it work in the middle of a 3,000 acre farm in Moultrie, you can make it work anywhere.

– Haja Kanu

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