Tag Archive for BSN Junior

Population health

Alex King, BSN Junior, BUNDLE Scholar

My name is Alex King, and I am a junior BSN candidate. I was born and raised in Atlanta, Georgia, and I started my college career at Georgia College and State University and transferred to Emory University for the Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing. For my community health rotation, I was fortunate enough to work with Dr. Phan at the Atlanta Housing Authority site. For this clinical rotation, we focused on identifying health disparities within the community then planned interventions accordingly. We identified social anxiety as the major health disparity among the population. We conducted a literature review and found that group therapy was very beneficial for people with social anxiety, so we decided to hold a session for them. I decided to take on the responsibility of leading this intervention. I had never conducted a group therapy session before, so I did some research and found out that the best way to conduct the group therapy session is to come up with discussion questions beforehand. I came up with “would you rather” questions such as “would you rather pause time or go back in time.” I thought that these would be fun and light way to get the ball rolling, but little did I know they would become heart-opening questions that would create new friendships. When I started the group therapy session, I was very nervous about how it would go and whether people would have a hard time opening up. Almost immediately once I started asking the would you rather questions people began opening-up. It was amazing how deep people got in answering the questions. When I asked them the question about pausing time or going back in time, it allowed people to reminisce with each other about the good times they had in the past when they were younger. What I found to be even more beneficial was when they started to talk about past life events that were hard for them or things they regretted. This then created a scenario where they started to support each other. When someone said that they lost their job, it instantly created an environment where people supported that individual in realizing what a good learning experience it was. They concluded that hos job loss created a life experience that allowed him to realize that if he could overcome that, he could overcome anything. This went on for more than an hour, and I ended up having to stop the session because it went over time. I would have never dreamed of this hour group therapy session being so productive, especially with having no experience beforehand. It made me realize how productive and beneficial it is to go into a community and provide services based on the needs of the population. This has given me a taste of how awesome it is to assess a community, prioritize their health disparities, research the issue, plan outcomes, and see the results that come from these outcomes and the wonderful benefits that follow. I am so glad that I got to do my public health clinical with the AHA, my Emory Nursing peers, and Dr. Phan.

It’s a PA, It’s a MD, … um it’s a NURSE!

The journey to becoming a nurse was rather unconventional for me. I knew when I began started at Emory College that I wanted to do something that involved being around people, making a difference, and a change of pace every now and then. My experience may be a little different from my fellow colleagues because I transitioned from Emory College to the Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing. My first week was filled with orientation and getting a feel of the college. We had orientation leaders and small group discussion among first-year students. The first few questions were aimed at getting to know one another.

“What is everyone’s perspective major or career track?”

I honestly did not know and I assumed that a few people did not know as well. We were a group of 12, so I was interested to hear what others wanted to do in the future. As everyone went around the circle all I heard was ‘I want to be a doctor.’ This was then followed by someone who said that they assumed that’s how the rest of the circle felt like. I was surprised not because of my peer’s response, but of my orientation leaders lack to facilitate the conversation in a more neutral light. However, this was not a problem that simply remained in my first few weeks of college, but the mindset that if you were not doing medicine then you were doing public health followed me until I came across nursing.

A friend of mine who was thinking about pursuing nursing invited me to sit in on one of their lectures. It was the end of freshman year and I was in a crisis because I simply had no idea what I wanted to do, so I said to myself, “why not?” The lecture we decided to audit was a Patho course and I was hooked as soon as class started. The professor was engaging and even though the class was three hours time seemed to fly. She was not only engaging but showed so much passion for the course that I wanted to take it. Soon after I had a chance to talk to a few of the students and they told me about the ups and downs of nursing school. I appreciated how open and honest they were being with a complete stranger. By the time I left I had made a decision. I was going to pursue nursing as a career because it had so much to offer.

You are probably wondering about my title. This post represents my journey to nursing school and the wall society automatically puts up because you are a nurse. My mom was not against it, but she proceeded to ask me if I was going to use this as an opportunity to go to med school. A few people who I tell that I am a nursing student ask me the same thing. I’m not mad about this, but simply sad that the career does not get the recognition and appreciation that others do simply because of the lack of knowledge most people have about the profession. I honestly do not blame anyone for that. If you are a Grey’s Anatomy fanatic and all that you know about health care is what you see on TV, then I fully expect misconceptions about the roles in a real hospital.

As people I interact with have gained greater exposure to the life of a nursing student, I have seen their appreciation and also respect for my career choice. One of the most memorable days I think a future nurse ever experiences is when a patient truly thanks them for saving their life. Those are the moments I live for. Those moments are what give me the satisfaction that I will someday be a nurse.

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Gloria Alafe is a BSN junior as well as a BUNDLEs Scholar who looks forward towards embracing the diverse field of nursing. Her interest includes pediatric ICU as well as generational PTSD.

Triumph Over Limitations

Jordan Waites, BSN Junior, BUNDLE Scholar

My name is Jordan Waites. I am a Junior in the traditional BSN program. I am an active member of Emory Global Health Nursing Association, Global Medical Missions Alliance, Emory Student Nurses Association, and BUNDLE scholar. I have always enjoyed aiding underserved populations through various volunteer opportunities. I have served in rural areas of New Mexico, Alaska, and Peru. Additionally, I have volunteered at Mommy & Me Family Literacy Program with Friends of Refugees in Clarkston, Georgia. After observing the needs of these populations, my long-term goal is to provide compassionate patient care in the mission field. I am grateful for the opportunities provided by Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing because volunteer work is a true passion of mine. When I found out about an opportunity to volunteer at a weekend camp for families with high-functioning children on the autism spectrum, I felt led to offer my time. I personally felt passionately about this opportunity because I have an adult brother who struggles with Asperger’s Syndrome. I have witnessed society’s negative attitude towards my brother. He is a happy, unsuspecting young man who wants to be accepted. I realize the importance of unconditional love, compassion, and the need for positive collaboration between families and counselors.

As a volunteer “Family Pal,” my task during the weekend camp was to assist families with activities. This allowed me to work very closely with children on the spectrum as well as their family members. As I was exposed to various families, I noticed that although many of the children were on the high-functioning end of the spectrum, they were all unique. Each of them had different struggles and concerns. Many could verbally communicate, whereas some only used 2-3 word sentences. Some could implement problem-solving, however, others experienced anxiety during activity. Throughout the weekend, I heard the quote, “When you meet one child with autism, you only meet ONE child with autism,” and I could not agree more with the statement. The struggles of one child could be another’s strength and vice versa. I learned through my camp experience that children and adults on the autism spectrum require personalized care. I believe that this knowledge is vital to understand as children and adults continue to be diagnosed on the autism spectrum.

I could not be happier that I took advantage of the opportunity that was provided to me by the School of Nursing. I am sure that many of the families who attended are very pleased that they were given the opportunity as well. On the final day of camp, a mother shared with me that her daughter recently had trouble with peers at school. The child would pull her hair out due to frustration and anxiety and children at school would question and mock her. The mother explained to me that camp was an opportunity for her daughter to be around other children who may struggle with the same difficulties. She expressed that the weekend camp was a safe place for her child to triumph over her struggles. In a similar way, volunteering at a weekend camp was a wonderful opportunity for me to step back from the stress of exams and deadlines in nursing school. It was a unique experience that enabled me to make a positive impact in the lives of others. Individuals with disabilities often are stigmatized, encountering not only physical barriers in daily

Individuals with disabilities often are stigmatized, encountering not only physical barriers in daily life but also emotional barriers. Loved ones cannot always protect them from subtle forms of discrimination and prejudice. School-age children with disabilities often have negative school experiences related to their disability. I understand the support families need and the importance of empathetic care. As a nurse, I look forward to providing support and helping families create a positive environment, focusing on their child’s aspirations instead of their limitations.

Confessions of a Nursing Student

Aaron Montgomery, BSN Junior, BUNDLE Scholar

It was cold. It was 5 a.m. so the sky was still pitch black.  There was not a single car riding through the streets.  I had never seen that stretch of road so empty.  I sped up my walking pace to make sure I didn’t arrive late.  The first day was here and I was determined to make a good impression.  I had a feeling that I was forgetting something so I did ongoing checks to make sure I had my supplies: white shoes, watch, stethoscope, blood pressure cuff, and pen.  I started going through all the skills I had been taught in school.  There was no way I was going in unprepared.  As I approached the building, a feeling of nervousness took over.  I took a few seconds to calm down.  Then it was time to go in.  This was my first day of clinical and it was time to get started.

Looking back at that first day in October, it’s hard to believe that I was ever that nervous for clinic.  My first clinical experience has hands down been the best part of my first year of nursing school.  Early in the semester I had a hard time adjusting to the struggles that came with the program.  I had to get used to life in a new city, a new college, and professional school.  I wasn’t used to a full class schedule in addition to clinical experiences.  I didn’t know how to condense the seemingly infinite amount of information down to pass a 50-question exam.  And most of all, I thought I would never get an NCLEX style select-all-that-apply question correct. Ever.  But never once did I second guess my decision to go into nursing.  However, it was hard to envision all that hard work paying off. But that changed when clinical began.

During my first day, I was assigned to a patient in his mid-fifties who was recovering from a stroke.  I started the shift by giving him a bed bath.  Up until that point I had always taken for granted my own ability to bathe myself.  It was truly an honor to help someone perform such a simple but personal task.  After he was ready for the day, I accompanied him to radiology for a swallow evaluation.  I had only read about this procedure in textbooks so I was excited to get to see it in practice.  At the end of the shift, I went with my patient to therapy.  I got to see how the therapists transferred patients from their chairs, helped them walk, and assisted them with their daily activities.  This became valuable during later clinicals when I had to help move larger patients.  I stayed busy the full day.

Then it was time to meet with our clinical group to discuss our day.  My instructor was very direct and open about the expectations she had for us.  She didn’t hesitate to tell me the areas in which I needed improvement.  I worked on those areas, which improved both my confidence and competence.  It was time to leave for the day.  I walked out and instantly started thinking about the following day and how much I dreaded the idea of returning to class.  It hit me that not once during my shift did I think about school, or any of my other struggles.  For those eight hours I put my needs aside and focused on my patient.  There was no doubt that this is what I wanted to spend my life doing.  So far nursing school has had its share of struggles and triumphs, but I wouldn’t trade the experience for anything.

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Aaron Montgomery is a junior in the traditional BSN program.  Originally from Torrington, Connecticut, he moved to Atlanta to attend Emory following four years in the military.  He is part of the BUNDLES program and is hoping to serve as a Student Ambassador for the 2017-2018 school year.