Tag Archive for clinicals

My Experiences as a Student Nurse

Roya Shareefy, BSN Class of 2017, BUNDLE Scholar

Being in nursing school was definitely my most challenging years both academically and in life. When they say that nursing school takes over your life, I can say that nursing school truly did. I had to focus more on my studies than other aspects of life, and learn so much in a short amount of time. The clinical experience of nursing school allowed me to have the opportunity to put what I learned in my classes and readings into action. Clinicals really put in perspectivewhat it truly is like to be a nurse. We talk about this all the time in our classes, but nothing fully captures the skills and responsibilities necessary for nursing better than hands-on experience in a clinical environment.

I experienced so much during my clinical rotations. My first clinical rotation at the main Emory University Hospital eased me into performing nursing functions. I remember when I first started, I felt nervous about actually providing nursing care. When I compare myself to how I was when I first started clinicals, I have definitely learned and grown so much as a student nurse. One of my favorite experiences during clinical was when I had a patient who was first starting chemotherapy. My nurse preceptor told me that patients often experience an anaphylactic reaction to the medication when theyfirst start chemotherapy, so it is important to run the medication at a slower rate. My nurse preceptor said that if we had a patient who reacted to the medication, we should stop running the chemo, check the patient’s blood pressure, and then give the appropriate medication from the emergency kit. When I checked my patient a couple of minutes after starting his chemotherapy, I asked him questions related to a anaphylactic reaction. I also noticed his face was getting a little red and he looked short of breath. He mentioned having lower back pain, so I immediately stopped the infusion, started taking his blood pressure, and notified my nursing preceptor. His blood pressure was within his normal limits, so we gave him Benadryl via his IV. The Benadryl helped the patient, and we had the Benadryl running when we started his chemotherapy medication again, but at a slower rate stated by the physician. This time the patient did not have a anaphylactic reaction, and tolerated his chemotherapy well.

This experience taught me how important it is to asses your patient and to teach your patient beforehand about the reaction the patient could have due to the medication. My nurse preceptor and I taught our patient about the reactions he could have due to the chemotherapy; due to our teaching, our patient recognized his symptoms and was able to know that what he was experiencing was an expected adverse reaction. During clinicals, I had many experiences where I had to think on my feet and conduct nursing care quickly. These experiences taught me a lot about how to be a nurse and emphasized the importance of conducting proper patient care.

***

Roya Shareefy is  a fourth year student from Atlanta, Georgia pursing her BSN degree at Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing at Emory University. She is a BUNDLE Scholar, and serves on the executive board of Emory’s Multicultural Student Nursing Association.

Clinical Experience in Emory Midtown Hospital

Xiqin Huang, BSN Junior, BUNDLE Scholar

My name is Xiqin Huang, and I am a junior BSN student in the Emory School of Nursing. I am from Queens, New York.

The clinical rotation is very important component in the nursing education, because it can integrate your knowledge from lectures into real life settings. I had my medical/surgical clinical rotation in Emory Midtown Hospital for past 2 months, and it was a great experience.

My unit is an extremely busy because there are 50 beds with 10 nurses and 5 nurse techs. Also, in this unit, we had a great variety of patients such as COPD, HIV, pressure ulcers etc. During this clinical, I was able to see many diseases processes and nursing interventions that were described my textbooks. Usually, each student is assigned to one patient for the whole clinical rotation and paired up with that patient’s primary nurse. In 1st week in the hospital, I had a fabulous, wonderful nurse who really took her time to welcome and teach me. She asked me to explain all the medication to her. Also, she brought me to watch procedures on other patients that I wasn’t assigned so that I could get to experience new things.

Moreover, in this clinical, I was able to give different medications through different routes such oral, IV, G-tube etc. It was a wonderful learning opportunity to get more exposures in real hospital setting instead of reading books and watching videos. In my very last clinical shift, I was able to observe my patient’s surgical procedure, craniotomy. It is the surgical removal of part of the bone from the skull to expose the brain. And I saw other different types of nurses in operating room. A scrub nurse prepares the operating area by laying out the necessary instruments and equipment. Before each procedure, nurses thoroughly disinfect their hands and arms and then putting on sterile clothing. Under the direction of the surgeon, scrub nurses handle instruments, assist with procedures, and monitor the patient throughout the operation.

Overall, it was a wonderful experience for me in the nursing school, and it made me to become more interested in nursing field.

A Year Worth of Clinical

Isai Flores, BSN Junior, BUNDLES Scholar

The night before clinical I could not sleep from excitement. Filled with nervousness and anxiousness, I tossed and turned in my bed unaware that the morning was quickly approaching. I had organized everything I needed prior to going to bed. I neatly folded my scrubs and placed them on top of my dresser. I imagined how it would feel to finally be in the hospital in my uniform. I felt proud about all the skills that I had learned in the classroom. However, I also knew that I would not perform my skills on mannequins but rather on living people. I did not have the luxury of getting a second opportunity to perform the given skill. When I woke up in the morning, I put that anxiety behind me and pushed forward knowing I was prepared. I put my scrubs on, double-checked if I had packed everything and headed out the door anticipating my first footsteps in the hospital. I expected to see a wide array of patients – each unique with different health concerns and with different plans of care. I yearned to see how nursing theory translated into practice.

Turning left off of Ponce de Leon Drive, I saw the sign: Emory University Midtown Hospital. I was ready to enter the hospital and arrive at Unit 31. The culture of the unit could be summed up in one word: inviting. This was my first semester in nursing school.  They were very open to us even though we were students with very limited knowledge. I think by the end of that semester I had mastered the art of the bed bath. During that first rotation, I shadowed a nurse who had worked on that same unit for thirty years. She encouraged me to speak to the patients and ask her questions about anything I noticed. I asked her about how she schedules her day, how she chooses what assessments to perform on the patients, and so many other questions. She answered every single question with eagerness, willing to share her knowledge.

***

Second semester, so far had been fantastic. Population health and pediatrics were the best moments of my clinical experience. Waking up the morning of my first day of population health clinical, I knew I would be greeted by familiarity. First, because I had spent time at Mommy & Me for service learning last semester. Secondly because I hoped to stay with the same kids from last semester. Despite this familiarity with Mommy and Me, Clarkston was starkly unfamiliar to me. We have only a few weeks and the thought of planning a substantive intervention slightly worried me because six weeks seemed too little. I thought: how would we do this? What was the main problem that they faced? How would we help ameliorate all the health issues that this community faced daily? I knew the answer to that question already. We simply could not. At least – not in the time span that we have. However, I know that we could think of something that can, at least for the time being, address some of the health issues. At the end of my session, we made home visits to the mothers to further assess the health needs of the community. They were a source of inspiration and bounding resilience that could only be gained by personal experience. In the end, we worked on educating the mothers on health insurance and how to renew benefits for their children.

Overall I have learned that health care is so multi-faceted. The multi-dimensional approaches to health that we have taken in my clinical experience have surpassed my expectations. I look forward to next year and the future where I can learn more and achieve more.

~~~

Isai Flores is a third year student at Emory, in the school of nursing, pursing his BSN. He is a Gates Millennium Scholar and a BUNDLE Scholar.