Tag Archive for Immersion learning

Graduate Students Reflect on Immersion Experience during West Virginia Flooding

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School of Nursing graduate students participate every year in a two-week immersion program in West Virginia through the Lillian Carter Center for Global Health and Social Responsibility. Our students work in partnership with area federally-qualified community health centers to promote health and prevent disease throughout the region. Led by faculty Advisors Carolyn Clevenger and Debbie Gunter, students Andrea Brubaker, Phillip Dillard, Kimberly Eggleston, Hannah Ng, Jill Peters, Allysa Rueschenberg, and Abigail Wetzel, were providing essential health services through four community clinics located in cities to the north and south of Charleston. Two of our students, Phil Dillard and Abby Wetzel, were working in a clinic in Clendenin, a town 25 miles northeast of Charleston that was hit hard by the storms.

Phil Dillard discusses the experience in this WSB-TV Channel 2 interview. WSB Interview – West Virginia Flooding

Reflection before we go: ABSN Dominican Republic

Tomorrow morning we will begin our journey to San Francisco de Macoris, Dominican Republic as part of a Quality and Safety Improvement Project. In preparation for this journey, our group of 8 students obtained $390 worth of funds through hosting a “Kid’s Day” fundraiser and through donations of our families in order to purchase medical supplies for Hospital de San Vincente de Paul. This morning we met at the nursing school and divided up the supplies into all of our suitcases. These supplies included, but were not limited to, infant stethoscopes, a newborn blood pressure kit, pediatric resuscitation equipment, surgical drapes and gowns, surgical instruments, vaginal speculums, prenatal vitamins, tylenol, baby blankets, pacifiers, preemie diapers, and sterile gloves.

For our Quality Improvement project, we will be talking with members of Proyecto ADAMES, an organization that formed to address maternal and infant mortality in their community. We will be speaking (in Spanish!) to nurses at the hospital, community leaders in the surrounding barrios, and people at the university.

Dominican Republic is a country in the Carribbean that shares the island of Hispanola with Haiti. Approximately 9 million people live in Dominican Republic, with over half living under the national poverty line (Foster, et al, 2010). As with many lower-income countries, Dominican Republic is marked with financial inequalities as the poorest half of the country owns less than one-fifth the GDP and the richest 10% own two-fifths the total GDP (Foster, et al., 2010). Although 97% of all births occur within a hospital, there is a high rate of maternal (150-160 deaths/100,000) and infant (22 deaths/100,000) mortality (Foster, et al., 2010). While this rate is much lower than that of other “developing countries,” hospitalized births with skilled birth attendants are not the norm in other countries, as it is in Dominican Republic. Therefore, a need exists to improve quality care.

Foster, J., Burgos, R., Tejada, C., Caceres, R., Altamonte, A., Perez, L., Noboa, F. (2010). A community-based participatory research approach to explore community perceptions of the quality of maternal-newborn health services in Dominican Republic. Midwifery, 26, 504-511.