Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing doctoral students honored during the Georgia Nursing Leadership Coalition Doctoral Symposium

Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing doctoral students took top honors at the third annual Georgia Nursing Leadership Coalition (GNLC) Doctoral Symposium at Georgia State University. Emory School of Nursing PhD and DNP students presented five podium presentations and two poster presentations during the symposium. In addition, two of the three GNLC health policy scholarships and both of the symposium’s doctoral awards were awarded to Emory nursing students. Policy scholarships were selected based on research essays, academic performance, and letters of recommendation.

DNP student, Rosemary Kinuthia, received a $1,500 prize for winning a GNLC policy scholarship and $500 for receiving a doctoral project award. A $1,500 policy scholarship was also awarded to PhD student Gaea Daniel, and an additional $500 doctoral project award was given to PhD student Mariya Kovaleva. Policy

Podium and poster presentations included:

  • “Function as a Predictor of 20 Day Hospital Readmission” by DNP students Eve Byrd and Kristin Langston
  • “Evaluating Quality Measures of a Dedicated Educational Unit within a Magnet Institution: Recommendations for Healthcare Transformation” by DNP student Alexandra Finch
  • “Psychosocial Factors as a Driver of Excess Heart Failure Readmissions” by DNP students Hema Santhanam and Letizia Smith
  • “Where do Persons Living with Dementia Get their Primary Care?” by PhD student Mariya Kovaleva
  • “Validation of an Obstetric Risk Index” by PhD student Jennifer Vanderlaan
  • “Relationships Matter!” by PhD student Kent Haythorn
  • “How is Dementia Covered in US Baccalaureate Nursing Programs?” by PhD student Mariya Kovaleva

For a complete list of award winners and additional information about the GNLC Doctoral Symposium, please visit http://www.georgianursingleadershipcoalition.com/education.

Share and Enjoy:
  • email
  • Print
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Add to favorites
  • RSS
  • StumbleUpon

Top 7 Reasons Why You Should Choose Emory for Nursing School

Screen Shot 2015-08-17 at 4.18.46 PMFrom high school seniors looking to explore a wealth of health care careers to seasoned nurses ready to take on graduate learning for advanced practice, Emory University’s Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing offers an unparalleled nursing program to prepare students for a wide range of health care careers.

What makes Emory such an excellent nursing school? Here are seven big reasons why it’s a great choice for both undergraduate and graduate learning.

1. Emory University’s International Reputation
Consistently ranked in the top tier of competitive universities in the United States, Emory is also an internationally renowned center of cutting-edge health research and care delivery. Nursing students at Emory have the unique opportunity to study alongside some of the greatest health care leaders anywhere in the world at Emory University.

2. Clinical Partnerships
In addition to Emory Healthcare, nursing students here are encouraged to take advantage of partnerships with more than 500 other sites in the greater Atlanta area and the United States at large for their clinical coursework. Program coordination is arranged by the School of Nursing.

3. Amazing Faculty
Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing faculty members are incredible nurses who love to share what they know to inspire the nurses of tomorrow. The faculty includes award-winning professors like Deborah Watkins Bruner, the first and only nurse to lead a National Cancer Institute cooperative group, and Assistant Professor Rasheeta Chandler, who was named to the 40 Under 40 Leaders in Minority Health list in 2016.

4. Service Learning and Global Health
Attending nursing school at Emory is about more than just classroom learning and clinical practice. The Lillian Carter Center for Global Health and Social Responsibility encourages service learning and provides opportunities for students to offer health care to underserved populations through programs like the Alternative Break Program and Graduate Student Immersion sessions around the world.

5. Life in Atlanta
Emory is located in a beautiful neighborhood within the vibrant metropolis of Atlanta. Southern charm meets world-class businesses, dining, shopping and sport venues that make life here hard to beat. Atlanta is a hub of the South that’s located within easy striking distance of Florida beaches and mountains of fun in the Great Smokies, so there’s something to satisfy all tastes and interests.

6. Student Life
Atlanta offers a wealth of entertainment and cultural opportunities, but there’s also a whole world of activities available to students on campus. The nursing school provides a close-knit community and plenty of student services to assist with everything from clinical placement to career advising. There are also clubs, intramural sports and a wide range of student groups to join.

7. Emory Traditions
The culture of student life at Emory runs deep, and it’s often the little things about campus life that students remember. Highlights of the many traditions at Emory include an annual town hall meeting hosted by former president Jimmy Carter, and special events on Wonderful Wednesdays. The nursing programs at Emory University is about more than just a top-notch clinical education — though the Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing certainly offers that to students. It’s also about the building of relationships with fellow students, faculty and the community at large that sets the Emory nursing school apart.

Find out more by scheduling a campus visit today.

Share and Enjoy:
  • email
  • Print
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Add to favorites
  • RSS
  • StumbleUpon

5 Tips to Successfully Apply to Top Nursing Schools

emorynursingapplicationtipsWith careers in nursing booming, getting into a top-notch nursing program has become a competitive endeavor. According to a report by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, U.S. nursing schools turned away 68,938 qualified applicants away because of the high demand for nursing education.

Nursing is a rewarding and challenging field with dozens of specialties. Talented nurses hailing from the nation’s most prestigious nursing schools are able to find work in their field at hospitals and in doctors’ offices all over the country.

If you’re interested in choosing nursing for your career, your next step is to put together a strong application to impress the programs you’re interested in. Feeling nervous about getting it all done? Try these tips to get organized and successfully apply to top nursing schools.

1. Do Your Research

Before you apply, study up on what each program offers to make sure your preferred specialties, learning styles and locations are covered. You’ll also want to visit the campus to get a sense of what life there is like.

2. Apply to More Than One School

Rank your favorites, and apply to your personal top three to five programs. If you get accepted to more than one, you’ll be able to compare and contrast the programs and any financial aid packages to make an informed decision.

3. Apply Early

This is especially important if you’re looking at a program with a rolling admissions process — you don’t want all the spaces to be filled before you send in your application! Applying early gives the admissions committee time to consider your application and may give you a leg up on getting scholarship money. Scholarship awards are awarded generously to applicants who apply before the priority scholarship deadline.

4. Be Yourself

Admissions committees look to create diverse student bodies, so be sure to list all your previous jobs, extracurricular activities, volunteer work and any other unique leadership roles you’ve taken on. Let your personality shine through in your application. You can bring your application to life by giving the admission committee the chance to get to know you. Most schools offer Open Houses, Virtual Webinars, Facebook Chats, and Shadow Days. These are all excellent ways for you to get to know the school and for the school to get to know you.

5. Proofread

While showing off your unique style is a good thing, irregular spelling and grammar are not. Be sure to carefully edit and proofread your full application to avoid careless mistakes. These may be innocent, but they show a lack of attention to detail that points to a lack of effort — and a quick rejection.

Next Steps

As you research top nursing programs, be sure to check out Emory University’s Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing. Emory makes it easy to schedule a visit and learn more about its programs through information sessions. When you’re ready, try Emory’s new online application to the nursing program. It’s quick, it’s easy, and it takes less than 30 minutes to get started on your future today.

Share and Enjoy:
  • email
  • Print
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Add to favorites
  • RSS
  • StumbleUpon

Washington D.C. Public Policy Trip

In mid-September, I had an extraordinary opportunity to participate in a trip to Washington DC to focus on opportunities for getting involved in public policy. The trip was primarily for Emory Scholars from the College of Arts and Sciences, but Ericka Armstead and I were able to join the group to represent the School of Nursing. We were able to speak with many inspirational people in a variety of influential positions including accomplished Emory alumni, lobbyists, five members of Congress, and their staff members.

Me (Kevin Currie) and Ericka Armstead

Me (Kevin Currie) and Ericka Armstead

            I believe that the work of the recent alumni that I was able to meet personifies Emory University’s commitment to civic engagement and community building. Some roles that stood out to me include “think tank” employees advising policymakers on how to best develop low-income housing, a hate crimes prosecutor for the Department of Justice, and the President’s assistant. Seeing these Emory alumni who had graduated within the past 10 years in such powerful positions made me quickly realize that with passion for an issue and commitment to a vision, anyone has the potential to make a substantive difference for the lives of others.

            I also had the opportunity to speak with a handful of lobbyists and advocates who work on Capitol Hill. These individuals were advocating for things like full reimbursement of the care for the Ebola patients that Emory provided, Multiple Sclerosis research funding, and funding for the development of Winship’s experimental oncology drugs. I knew very little about what lobbyists actually do in Washington DC and assumed they are mostly corporate representatives trying to change laws in favor of their company. Seeing the advocacy for public health policy initiatives was an eye-opening experience, showing how we, as involved future nurses, have many opportunities to have our voice heard by policymakers through membership in nursing organizations or directly lobbying or advocating for specific issues. 

Me and Ericka with Emory’s Government and Community Affairs employees (Cameron Taylor, far left and Emily Fisher, far right) and Dr. Donald Harvey from the Winship Cancer Institute, center

Me and Ericka with Emory’s Government and Community Affairs employees (Cameron Taylor, far left and Emily Fisher, far right) and Dr. Donald Harvey from the Winship Cancer Institute, center

            I was very excited to learn that we would be meeting with some of the actual policymakers for question and answer sessions. We met with 5 members of Congress and their chiefs of staff, representing a variety of geographical locations, special interests, and political affiliations. Some highlights of the meetings are as follows:

·       Representative Kathy Castor, an Emory alumna whose district is primarily Tampa, Florida, spoke about her commitment to clean energy and education.

·       Georgia Representative Tom Price, a surgeon who had completed his residency at Emory, spoke about his job as the Chairman of the House Budget Committee and how fiscal conservatism can sometimes clash with funding worthy causes.

·       Georgia Representatives John Lewis and Sanford Bishop talked about their involvement in and commitment to civil rights issues. Speaking with Representative Lewis was particularly moving for me, because he spoke about his leadership position in the sit-ins in my hometown of Nashville, Tennessee and the recent sit-in on the House floor. He stressed the importance of being organized, controlled, and non-violent when trying to make social change. It was no surprise to me that President Obama called Representative Lewis his role model two days later as they each spoke at the opening of the National Museum of African American History and Culture—Representative Lewis truly is an inspirational man.

Representative John Lewis speaking with our group

Representative John Lewis speaking with our group

·       Georgia Senior Senator Johnny Isakson, who is the Chairman of the Senate Committee on the Department of Veterans Affairs, responded to my question regarding his stance on expansion of scope of practice for Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs) in the Veteran’s Health Administration. 

Me speaking with Senator Johnny Isakson

Me speaking with Senator Johnny Isakson

            This trip to Washington DC showed me how there is a lot more to public health than epidemiology and community health events—there is significant potential for nurses to influence and educate policymakers on important and relevant healthcare and nursing-specific issues. A nurse’s role as a patient advocate is easily translatable into advocating for certain public policies—we try to help make decisions in someone’s best interest, especially when advocating for those who might have a health knowledge deficit or be disabled or otherwise marginalized. Nurses have a unique opportunity to bring real life stories from direct patient care to Capitol Hill, adding an additional dimension of emotion and humility to a decision making progress. A nurse’s role should not be seen as one limited to a clinical setting; advocating for public policy provides tremendous potential to become a nurse leader and agent of widespread change.

Share and Enjoy:
  • email
  • Print
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Add to favorites
  • RSS
  • StumbleUpon

What NOT to Wear, Emory Edition

When I started nursing school last fall at Emory, one of the more confusing topics (aside from Pathophysiology) was the dress code for clinical and lab settings. I had heard from other students that it was allowable to wear certain articles of clothing or shoes, while the student handbook stated differently.

First thing’s first: When in doubt, GO BY THE STUDENT HANDBOOK! If you are ever questioning whether or not you are appropriately attired for clinical or lab refer to the written guidelines.

Below is your basic uniform for clinical and lab. Honestly, this is all you need (plus white socks!). The simpler, the better.

IMG_6635Here are some tips on what NOT to wear in the lab or clinical setting:

1. Nail Polish/Fake Nails. Trust me on this one, y’all. You will want to be able to see what is under those finger nails after a 12 hour shift of wound care. Also, fake nails are known to slice through gloves and get lost in patients’ bed sheets (yuck!)

2. Your Hair Down. Tie that hair back! The last thing you want is your hair dragging through a patient’s wound or blocking your eyesight while trying to insert an IV. It’s a good idea to always carry extra hair ties and clips.

3. Tattoos. Emory requires that you cover up any visible tattoos while you are in the lab and at your clinical sites. I’ve seen some pretty creative ways to cover up a tattoo, but I’ve heard that bandaids usually work the best. However, some people use makeup as well depending on the size and placement of the tattoo. It would be best to do some trial and error to discover what works before your first day of lab.

4. Long Sleeve Shirts Under Your Scrub Top. Coming from someone who is permanently cold, this can be very difficult. However, it is against the guidelines to wear a long-sleeve shirt under your scrub top for sanitary purposes. Instead, you can purchase a navy blue or white cuffed long-sleeved jacket to keep you warm in lab or at your clinical sites. Uniform Advantage has cuffed, long-sleeved jackets available and you can get our logo embroidered on it through them.

Screen Shot 2016-08-18 at 9.08.02 PM

5. Jewelry that Dangles….Or Jewelry in General. For the most part, wearing jewelry at lab or in clinical is not a good idea. Anything that dangles from your wrist, your neck, or your ears is bound to get caught on something or worse, caught IN something (*shudders*). Rings can also cause a problem as they can easily slice through gloves. A good rule of thumb is just to leave your jewelry at home where it is safe and out of the way. One small stud per ear is okay, and wedding bands are permissible. Do not, I repeat, do not wear your engagement ring to lab or clinical! I heard a horrible story about a nursing student who lost the stone from her engagement ring while changing a patient’s bed and it was never found.

6. Your Workout Sneakers. While at your clinical sites you are going to step in some gross stuff and even more gross stuff is going to spill on your shoes (I speak from unfortunate experience). You want to wear shoes that are durable and can easily be washed. Get some comfortable, solid white or black leather or vinyl shoes and leave your sneakers at home. Once again, Uniform Advantage has a great shoe selection, but there are other shopping options (such as Amazon) that you can explore.

7. Jeans. I know, I know, this one seems obvious, but it needs to be said. There will be times when you will need to wear your long, white lab coat and under that lab coat can be a) your Emory scrubs or b) business casual attire. NO JEANS! See below for some appropriate examples.

FullSizeRender 2 FullSizeRender 4 FullSizeRender 5 IMG_6639

8. Open-Toed Shoes. One of the most painful experiences that I have had is a gurney rolling over my toes, and I was wearing close-toed shoes. Imagine if they had been open….needless to say, all shoes must be close-toed in the lab and in the clinical setting.

9. Forgetting Your ID Badge. You need to have your ID badge with you AT ALL TIMES in the lab and at the clinical sites. That badge is your lifeline and it helps to identify you as an Emory student. It helps you get in and out of parking garages, medication rooms, and hospital units, just to name a few. It is costly to replace and difficult to go a day without, so be diligent about keeping it within reach.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share and Enjoy:
  • email
  • Print
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Add to favorites
  • RSS
  • StumbleUpon

Nursing school tips

Nursing school is all about time management. There needs to be time to learn, study and have fun!

I have realized that the best way to prepare yourself for nursing school is to have a planner or calendar where you can put all assignments, exams and events. This helps with staying on top of things once the semester starts to become hectic. Ensure that you incorporate time for what you love most such as family, friends and pets. This definitely helps ease the stress levels.

Also making or joining a study group is helpful, by keeping each other on track and making new friends. There are also clubs and organizations, such as Admission Ambassadors. You can join this and represent the Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, by assisting with alumni events, open houses, tours, etc.

There are elective courses such as Research Residency that is a great way to stay involved with upcoming research, and interacting with Professors. I had the opportunity of working with Dr. Yvonne Commodore-Mensah on her Afro Cardio Metabolic Study, which focused on African immigrant health in the Atlanta metropolitan area. It was an amazing experience, I participated during the spring and summer semester. I was able to get CITI certification, learn how to operate RedCAp database, enter data and collect data from the volunteers.

Nurses are well rounded individuals and nursing school prepares us to manage multiple task at any given time.

Share and Enjoy:
  • email
  • Print
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Add to favorites
  • RSS
  • StumbleUpon

Preventing and Responding to Venomous Snakebites

CopperheadMSN student Caitlin Cundiff participated in Dian Evans’ Environmental Emergencies lecture last month, which included information about patient treatment and monitoring after venomous snakebites. Little did she know how quickly she would be employing the evidence-based guidelines and management strategies for treating snakebites that she learned in class. While on her hospital medicine rotation in the Emory University Hospital Emergency Department, Caitlin was called to join a hospital medicine team that was in the process of treating a patient who had been bitten by a three-foot copperhead snake. Caitlin used her training to teach the Emergency Department nurses and hospital medicine staff about how to prepare and use anti-venom and how to monitor patients for progressive envenomation. While this particular patient’s bite was clinically mild and did not require antivenom, medical treatment is always advised to minimize tissue damage the risk of secondary infection.

Snakebites are common in the Southeastern United States, especially during warmer months when snakes are more active and people are spending more time outdoors. Copperheads are particularly abundant in the Atlanta area and are responsible for the majority (50 percent) of venomous snakebites. Copperheads have a copper-colored triangular-shaped head and are usually a tan to copper color with hourglass markings on their back. Their muted colors enable them to blend in well with leaves and bushes, increasing chances of an accidental encounter. While venom from a Copperhead snake is rarely fatal to humans, any venomous snakebite can become serious health emergency.

Keep the following tips in mind to protect yourself and your health.

  • Do not pick up or try to kill venomous snakes. If you see one, walk the other way and call animal control.
  • If you attempt to kill a copperhead, and they look dead, they can still bite and inject venom reflexively. Don’t pick them up!!
  • Copperhead bites are very painful and can cause progressive tissue swelling, bruising and bleeding.
  • The best treatment for a copperhead bite is to immediately get to the nearest emergency department.
  • If bitten on an extremity remove all constricting rings and jewelry, then elevate and extend the limb to reduce swelling and tissue damage around joints.
  • Do not cut a bite wound to try to get it to bleed more or to suck out the venom as this can cause a serious infection and won’t help reduce the venom effects.
  • Do not apply ice or an Ace wrap to the wound as this can worsen tissue damage.
  • Keep track of the time that you were bitten because once you arrive for care in the emergency department your wound will be evaluated for progressive envenomation by measuring the degree of swelling around the wound every 15-20 minutes.
  • Antivenom may need to be given based on how rapidly the bitten area swells and where the bite is located.

For more information on venomous snakes and treatment guidelines, click here.

Share and Enjoy:
  • email
  • Print
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Add to favorites
  • RSS
  • StumbleUpon

Graduate Immersion Experience During West Virginia Flooding

Flooded streets and businesses in Clendenin, West Virginia

Graduate students in the School of Nursing’s Nurse Practitioner program Phil Dillard (Emergency) and Abby Wetzel (Nurse-Midwifery) discuss their immersion program experience with Cabin Creek Health Systems. The students worked alongside staff of the Clendenin Clinic to evacuate medically-fragile residents during the region’s recent storms and devastating flooding. Cabin Creek is a federally-qualified health center that provides essential health services to vulnerable populations in rural West Virginia through several community-based clinics.

 

Share and Enjoy:
  • email
  • Print
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Add to favorites
  • RSS
  • StumbleUpon

Graduate Students Reflect on Immersion Experience during West Virginia Flooding

WV_Houses

School of Nursing graduate students participate every year in a two-week immersion program in West Virginia through the Lillian Carter Center for Global Health and Social Responsibility. Our students work in partnership with area federally-qualified community health centers to promote health and prevent disease throughout the region. Led by faculty Advisors Carolyn Clevenger and Debbie Gunter, students Andrea Brubaker, Phillip Dillard, Kimberly Eggleston, Hannah Ng, Jill Peters, Allysa Rueschenberg, and Abigail Wetzel, were providing essential health services through four community clinics located in cities to the north and south of Charleston. Two of our students, Phil Dillard and Abby Wetzel, were working in a clinic in Clendenin, a town 25 miles northeast of Charleston that was hit hard by the storms.

Phil Dillard discusses the experience in this WSB-TV Channel 2 interview. WSB Interview – West Virginia Flooding

Share and Enjoy:
  • email
  • Print
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Add to favorites
  • RSS
  • StumbleUpon

Day 10 (6/24) – Las chicas de Moultrie

Day 10 – Las Chicas de Moultrie

For the final blog post, I thought I’d switch it up a little bit. I took part in this program alongside 14 amazing nursing students. Before this trip, most of us did not know much about each other, or the program, for that matter. But we are leaving Moultrie as sisters and more culturally competent nurses. For this blog post, I asked each of these wonderful girls how they felt about the Farm Worker Family Health Program. These were there answers:

"It's great to see how much good we are doing now. I would love to see how this program continues to grow in the coming years." Taryn Connelly, BSN Candidate '17

“It’s great to see how much good we are doing now. I would love to see how this program continues to grow in the coming years.” Taryn Connelly, BSN Candidate ’17

"Thank you Moultrie, and all the staff members, for providing us with an invaluable experience ." Ashley Rim, BSN Candidate '17

“Thank you Moultrie, and all the staff members, for providing us with an invaluable experience.” Ashley Rim, BSN Candidate ’17

"It's incredible to see how choosing to make a small difference can make a huge difference in someone else's life." Jennifer Zhang, BSN Candidate '17

“It’s incredible to see how choosing to make a small difference can make a huge difference in someone else’s life.” Jennifer Zhang, BSN Candidate ’17

 

 

"This was a better experience than I expected. The farm workers are very humble and appreciative. I wish we were here for a longer time." Alejandra Mendez, BSN Candidate '17

“This was a better experience than I expected. The farm workers are very humble and appreciative. I wish we were here for a longer time.” Alejandra Mendez, BSN Candidate ’17

"I had an amazing experience in Moultrie. The need is great in the farmworker population, but I am glad I was able to serve them through this program by putting a little seed forward. I am eager to take all the experiences and knowledge I gained through this trip to help vulnerable populations in the future." Karime Parra, BSN Candidate '17

“I had an amazing experience in Moultrie. The need is great in the farmworker population, but I am glad I was able to serve them through this program by putting a little seed forward. I am eager to take all the experiences and knowledge I gained through this trip to help vulnerable populations in the future.” Karime Parra, BSN Candidate ’17

"The best moments down in Moultrie happened when we were able to break down language barriers and share genuine laughter with the hardworking men we were caring for. It's that basic human connection that causes us to invest on a deeper level and to spark change for the future." Halle Sovich (left), BSN Candidate '18

“The best moments down in Moultrie happened when we were able to break down language barriers and share genuine laughter with the hardworking men we were caring for. It’s that basic human connection that causes us to invest on a deeper level and to spark change for the future.” Halle Sovich, BSN Candidate ’18

"This was really a great experience. I'm gonna go home and learn some Spanish!" Olivia Atlas, BSN Candidate '17

“This was really a great experience. I’m gonna go home and learn some Spanish!” Olivia Atlas, BSN Candidate ’17

"The children and farm workers we treated in Moultrie taught me one of the best lessons a nurse could ever learn. Sometimes the best medicine isn't medicine at all, but just some love and attention to let them know that someone cares." Jamie Smith, BSN Candidate '18

“The children and farm workers we treated in Moultrie taught me one of the best lessons a nurse could ever learn. Sometimes the best medicine isn’t medicine at all, but just some love and attention to let them know that someone cares.” Jamie Smith, BSN Candidate ’18

"I really learned a lot about myself during this trip. I am really thankful for this experience." Lucy Barr, BSN Candidate '18

“I really learned a lot about myself during this trip. I am really thankful for this experience.” Lucy Barr, BSN Candidate ’18

"The most important lesson I learned from the Farmworker Family Health Program is a lesson in appreciation. It is so easy to get swept up in the small stressors of daily life and to lose sight of the many gifts we are given. The farmworkers, however, continuously smiled and were grateful to see us, despite just finishing a fifteen hour day of hard labor out in the sun. They never seemed to let their work conditions, living conditions, or being away from their families get the best of them. Instead, they focused on what they had in the present: companionship with one another and the opportunity to receive some love and attention through our care. Being able to see this first hand definitely made a lasting impact on me. Like the farm workers, I will be grateful for what I do have; I won't worry about what I lack. I joined the program to give back to a population that provides so much, but I ended up receiving so much more." Kari Burdzinski, BSN Candidate'18

“The most important lesson I learned from the Farmworker Family Health Program is a lesson in appreciation. It is so easy to get swept up in the small stressors of daily life and to lose sight of the many gifts we are given. The farmworkers, however, continuously smiled and were grateful to see us, despite just finishing a fifteen hour day of hard labor out in the sun. They never seemed to let their work conditions, living conditions, or being away from their families get the best of them. Instead, they focused on what they had in the present: companionship with one another and the opportunity to receive some love and attention through our care. Being able to see this first hand definitely made a lasting impact on me. Like the farm workers, I will be grateful for what I do have; I won’t worry about what I lack. I joined the program to give back to a population that provides so much, but I ended up receiving so much more.” Kari Burdzinski, BSN Candidate’18

"I feel very fortunate to have been able to attend Moultrie as my first clinical experience and will remember how appreciative these farmworkers were. Moultrie offered me the opportunity to work in an interdisciplinary team with other compassionate and dedicated health care providers. I sincerely hope that Emory continues to send nursing students to help provide care to this deserving population." Grace Pixler, BSN Candidate '18

“I feel very fortunate to have been able to attend Moultrie as my first clinical experience and will remember how appreciative these farmworkers were. Moultrie offered me the opportunity to work in an interdisciplinary team with other compassionate and dedicated health care providers. I sincerely hope that Emory continues to send nursing students to help provide care to this deserving population.” Grace Pixler, BSN Candidate ’18

Jennifer Ratcliffe, BSN:

Being involved with the Moultrie FWFH project for a second time has given depth to my understanding of this population’s circumstances. Their personal stories were heart wrenching and their medical histories will help me remember musculoskeletal disorders, and the effects of pesticides on integumentary and nervous systems, among others.

“This trip taught me to be open to change.” Cathy Wei, BSN Candidate ’18

 

As for me, I am beyond grateful. Grateful to the amazing preceptors and directors of the program. Grateful to the churches, organizations, and people of Moultrie who opened their arms and hearts to us. Grateful to the hotels and other donors in Atlanta who gave us clothes, pillows, toiletries, and various other items to give to the farm workers. Most importantly, I am grateful to the wonderful men and women who endure so much to bring food to our tables so that they may try to provide for their families. Being able to practice what I love while providing a necessary service to an oftentimes overlooked group of people has been such an amazing experience for me. I am so happy that I was one of the special students chosen to participate in this incredible program.

 

-Haja Kanu

 

Share and Enjoy:
  • email
  • Print
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Add to favorites
  • RSS
  • StumbleUpon